Proper procedure for reinstalling previous version

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by dld, Oct 7, 2005.

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  1. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    I installed the trial version of TI 9.0 in order to see if a problem on TI 8.0.937 had been fixed in the new version. After having verified that the problem still existed in the new version, I had three choices to return to the previous version.

    1) Use TI 9.0 to restore an image of my system created with TI 8.0.937. I know this is probably possible. It's just that I don't yet feel comfortable in restoring my system unless no alternative exists.

    2) Use the TI 8.0.937 bootable rescue disk to restore same image. Again, I would prefer avoiding a restoration.

    3) Uninstall TI 9.0 and reinstall the previous version. This is what I opted for. Problem is, this can become tedious. If I've gone through three versions in the past, then I have 75 alphanumeric entries to make. Is there any way of entering these values other than pecking away at it?

    I also was unsure as to what to do regarding drivers. At one point I was told that certain drivers for Acronis existed on my computer which drivers were newer than the ones about to be installed, or words to that effect. I opted not to overwrite the new drivers.

    I would appreciate the advice of more experienced users on this.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2005
  2. mark7

    mark7 Registered Member

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    Well, I can vouch for method 2). caveat: I use TI v8 , not 9. This is what I do on a regular basis - some dozen or so times in the last 6 months with TI v8 in the process of trying out new softwares (including TI v9).

    Prior to trusting TI, I created an image using my older tried and true imaging software to HD and CD & DVD(just-in-case images). Then I created/verfied a TI image to HD and burned it to CD and DVD, also verifying the removeable media. Then I booted using TI rescue CD and did a complete verify & restore of my system and data partitions from the TI HD image. Next, hold breath and reboot. I did not have to hold my breath too hard, as I had the ol' trusty image from my previous imaging program to fall back on.

    Of course, the very first time you do this, if you have no "trusty backup image" you know 100% will work if the *new* image fails, the holding your breath stage can cause some nervousness...

    IMO you should try to test your recovery scheme this way - someday you might have to do it, and it is good to know beforehand it will work.

    edit - > I've even "stressed" this method by imaging, then deleting key folders on the system drive, intentionally hosing my O/S, then proceeding with an image restore. Now this will give you a greater warm n' fuzzy when it works and you are back 100%
     
  3. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    Thanks Mark. Knowing you've done it dozens of times without incident will give me more confidence next time. I guess eventually you get to use it like the Microsoft System Restore which did a half-arss job of restoration. The difference though was that with System Restore, you could undo your restoration.
     
  4. mark7

    mark7 Registered Member

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    Well dld, I depend on image restoring exclusively... I've got MS System Restore service disabled :) ... I don't like 1/2 baked solutions (or restores)
     
  5. Snakeyes

    Snakeyes Registered Member

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    Replace the newer drivers and all will be fine.
     
  6. rharris270

    rharris270 Guest

    I have used TI8, 7, and 6 to restore computers, and they have worked without errors.

    Please do not confuse Acronis products with Microsoft products. I too have been burned by MSBACKUP, and wonder why it is still part of windows.

    The only real problem I have had with TI was immediately after I built a PC with serial ATA hard drives, which were then an innovation. The first few builds of TI7 could not see the hard drives, when run from the bootable CD. I contacted Acronis support and they soon had a build with drivers for my disk controller. Once TI7 saw the disks, restore worked fine. So, my advice is to run the bootable CD up to the point of seeing the hard drive(s). If they appear, then feel confident to go on with the restoration. You might also want to verify the image before attempting to use it in a restore, although I have never bothered to do that.
     
  7. mark7

    mark7 Registered Member

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    No confusion here... TI, MSBACKUP, and MS System Restore are all horses of different colors. They are not even in the same family.

    IMO MS System Restore is not needed if you have a good imaging backup strategy that includes creating an image before installing ANY new software. Rollbacks are then easy to accomplish and you know it is a 100% rollback.

    I do occasionally use MSBACKUP to perform an incremental backup of select files and folders (such as My Documents, Favorites, Desktop, Outlook Express folders, any program ini files, etc.) when I do not want to image my entire system and program partititons. Since TI is so fast, this is a rare occurrance.

    Once in a blue moon though, such select current folders & files (esp. OE email folders) may be all I want to preserve if I decide to roll back to an image of a few days or a week ago. I run MSBACKUP on what I want to save, restore my image, and run MSBACKUP to replace the older files/folders. Of course, you do have to be cognizant of what you are replacing and this does not work on system files that have XP's file protection.

    In this manner, MSBACKUP can augment TI, but it certainly is no comparison or substitute!

    In the early days of Windows 3.x I did try to use MSBACKUP to perform a "system level" backup - once :p As you may have also discovered, it fails as it was not meant to be a 100% backup/restore that includes the registry and critical system files in use by the O/S.
     
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