Private Network Question

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Rainwalker, May 18, 2012.

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  1. Rainwalker

    Rainwalker Registered Member

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    A friend had a problem going on line. I took a look and found the DNS Server addys were missing and the IPv4 address was 192.168.0.2. The system is setup to run wireless. The computer is a home "standalone" Win7/64. I know very little of wireless, so my question is why would 192.168.0.2 be in the picture. Manually setting the DNS Server numbers did not fix the problem, but after then resetting winstock, system was back online. Still showing 192.168.0.2....why?
     
  2. act8192

    act8192 Registered Member

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    If the router's default IP is 192.168.0.1, then the next available IP is .2 which is what you see on a PC. Many routers have that default address, others have 192.168.1.1, and issue IPs in different ranges - .100 and up or .2 to .51, etc.
    To get DNS servers in the router's list working, you may want to release and renew the IP address. That should synchronize everything. To work in the router's interface your friend may have to use a cable and not by WiFi. Many routers won't allow you to configure the router by radio.
     
  3. Rainwalker

    Rainwalker Registered Member

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    Hello act8192. I understand what you wrote about the gateway etc. What concerned me was that after fixing and going online there was no proper IP address as such. As I understand it,192.168. ect is a private address and should not be used on the web. I had released and renewed prior to resetting TCP/IP stack...also added DNS servers. As I wrote, the system went back on line. Again, I am lost as to why the IP addy is what it is (still).......'cause of wireless o_O
     
  4. act8192

    act8192 Registered Member

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    Maybe I don't understand the question :( Won't be the first time.

    Where are you seeing that IP? What do you expect to see where?
    The 192.168.x.x is the IP of your PC on the LAN side (private) of the interface. The WAN side, public address, is the one from your/friend's ISP. That one you will not see on the computer. It'll be visible in the router's interface or modem's, someplace on overview or status WAN section.

    You can also see the WAN address if you use something like this
    http://whatismyipaddress.com/
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Right. This is the IP address that you see with "ipconfig /all" at the command prompt. It's the address that other devices on the LAN see. If you have another computer on the LAN, you can share folders, remote desktop etc using that address.

    Right. This isn't really your computer's address. It's the router's public Internet IP address. Your router translates traffic from private addresses (192.168.x.x) to the Internet and back. Google NAT for more about that.
     
  6. Rainwalker

    Rainwalker Registered Member

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    The two posts above this post I have understood for a long time. Just to say; The computer I wrote of might only be on a Lan in terms of the fact that many ISPs 'bundle' their customers into groups (not good). Aside from that, the computer is a 'standalone' @ home computer. So.....
     
  7. Victek

    Victek Registered Member

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    When you add a router to the system you create a LAN even though there may only be one computer connected to it.

    When you connect a computer directly to a Cable or DSL modem the assigned IP is usually the actual IP from the ISP. This is because most cable/dsl modems are only designed to support one computer and don't do NAT. It's necessary to add a router when you want to connect more than one computer and/or you want to add wireless. That introduces NAT and results in the computer receiving a private IP such as 192.168.x.x

    Hope this helps.
     
  8. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Right.

    Being on the Internet without NAT is a BAD idea, unless you're running a server, and know what you're doing!
     
  9. Victek

    Victek Registered Member

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    Yes, the extra isolation provided by NAT is desirable. Routers typically have a firewall as well.
     
  10. Rainwalker

    Rainwalker Registered Member

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    OK, I thought it might have to do with wireless. I don't know the first thing about it. Well, I know the first thing, it's the second thing and on up that had me wondering. I need to check something else on that computer when I have a chance, so might post back. Thanks Victek123.
     
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