PrivacyKeyboard query

Discussion in 'other anti-trojan software' started by ESQ_ERRANT, Aug 13, 2006.

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  1. ESQ_ERRANT

    ESQ_ERRANT Registered Member

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    I have been getting numerous application error messages since I installed PrivacyKeyboard. This compels me to reboot my computer frequently. I am aware that PrivacyKeyboard is indeed the culprit because, once I stop the program from running, I have no further problem with the running of any other software office app, security program or otherwise. I have been able to configure ProcessGuard and Anti-Executable relatively easy so that the programs recognize friendly apps and do not attempt to block them from running. Indeed, Anti-Executable does an initial scan of all files, during install, and automatically places them in a protected list. ProcessGuard like RegDefend gives prompts and, so, alerts me to the need to provide the app with the necessary rights.

    PrivacyKeyboard, when starting up, ostensibly detects apps that require maximum use of all computer functions in order to operate and places them in the "auto-detect module" list. However, I find the list of auto-detected apps few and far between. And, when a program does not run because PrivacyKeyboard prevents it from running, I never get a prompt or error message from the program but, rather, a windows application error message, and I find that, inevitably, I must manually add the execution file to the White list to avoid the wrath of PKB and the annoyance of an MS error message. This, however, is a time-consuming and tedious process.

    Thus, my query. Does anyone, who happens to use PrivacyKeyboard, know of a way to add .exe files to the White Protection List enmass? Note: I tried to get some assistance from Raytown Corp. -- the Company that developed and manufactures the program, but I always find myself talking to a receptionist, with a thick and peculiar accent, who invariably and disturbingly, knows less about the products that the Company manufactures than I do and cannot or will not direct me to support staff.

    Wilders Security has helped me in the past numerous times in resolving many other abstruse computer software issues and, indeed, gave me the confidence to install and utilize such security software gems as ProcessGuard, WormGuard, RegDefend et al. As I am a licensed attorney in sole practice, I must be my own IT staff.

    This is my first post to Wilders. Thank you in advance for your kind assistance.
     
  2. MICRO

    MICRO Registered Member

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    Esq.,

    If nothing is forthcoming here, did you try getting past the "Thickie" via their
    'Online tech. support' or their, support@anti-keylogger.com

    Regards.
     
  3. ESQ_ERRANT

    ESQ_ERRANT Registered Member

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    No I didn't. I'll give it a try via your link, and let you know if I get a response. Thanks Micro for one quick response!

    Sincere regards
     
  4. Devinco

    Devinco Registered Member

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    Welcome to Wilders ESQ_ERRANT.

    You may not like this advice seeing that you already own all these programs, but I'll say it anyway.
    Sometimes it is better to simplify your security setup. More is not always better in the case of security programs that perform similar functions.
    For example, running two realtime (memory resident) anti-virus is not a good idea. The same thing with HIPS type programs.

    While the three programs have apparently different goals, they are all whitelist type programs that can do almost the same thing, prevent new unknown programs from starting by themselves without your approval.

    Process Guard can be set to block new and changed applications, so it can take care of Anti-Executables job. This feature, along with other Process Guard features can prevent software keyloggers from being deployed on your computer. Microsoft Windows comes with a Virtual Keyboard, so you can defeat hardware keyloggers.

    It may be that one or two of the three similar programs is causing problems for the other.
    It is certainly easier to diagnose a problem when there is only one of the same type of program installed.
     
  5. controler

    controler Guest

    I have not tried PK for a while but do have a LIC for AK and followed it.
    Both seem to have the same GUI. I know with AK you can add the programs it finds to an ignore list such as BoClean. Idle, ect.
    I was wondering why you are using anti-exe if you have PG which has exe protection?

    Next if you are using XP, did you double click on the ERROR logs of apps and system in control panel admin tools? to see what is listed as the problem.

    controler
     
  6. ESQ_ERRANT

    ESQ_ERRANT Registered Member

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    Responsive to MICRO, Controler and DeVinco:

    Thanks all for your warm welcome and kind assistance. First, as suggested by MICRO, I did contact Raytown. The Company did get back to me the following day. Basically, I was told that the problems I seem to be having were "atypical" and a request was made for a rundown on my system -- the programs I have on it and the error messages I received. As I write this, I did take a look at the error logs as suggested by Controler and there was nothing from those that would suggest why I would be getting windows error messages apart from one particular, rather disturbing entry that noted that my hard drive (a 300 gig which I had purchased and installed less than 6 months ago) was set to fail. A Belarc Advisor report also mentioned this. I run two hard drives in mirror tandem to guard against just this exigency. But, I will take the machine into the shop for a checkup once I complete some legal documents that I have to get out of the way in the next few days.

    DeVinco is certainly correct that I should not be running two AV programs at one and the same time. Actually, I had NOD32 installed but not running when I attempted to install Kaspersky. Kaspersky would not complete the install having detected another AV, whether it was running or not. I then uninstalled NOD32 and installed Kaspersky without a hitch. Kaspersky eats CPU however and I decided to reinstall NOD32 and use the latter AV as my resident detector and Kaspersky only for in depth virus scans on a periodic basis. I had read in Wilders that another party had used this approach without a problem.

    DeVinco has a point that it is better to simplify a security setup. Indeed, the builder of my PC, whose Company specializes in building computers for small professional businesses, suggested that I need only an AV and a firewall, and I have read -- I believe on one Wilders thread -- that among many security and programming specialists, that is all that they use in their own setups although there may be a reverse snobbery operating here. The issue invariably narrows to: stability vs. security

    Loading up on security apps may indeed better protect one from the horrors of assundary hacker attacks, but, insofar as the best products tend, at this point in time at least, not to be all-in-ones, and as they come from different manufacturers, there will always be compatibility issues. Perhaps that is why many individuals abstain from the use of registry cleaners with their concomitant problems and shun, as well, the installation of avant garde anti-malware products -- preferring, periodically, to scrub their machines and do a clean reinstall -- thereby erasing the existence of any virus or spyware insurgent if there ever was one lying dormant in the interstices of the thing.

    Be that as it may, I am constantly hearing of the eventuality of even more insidious and virulent forms of viruses and rootkits. Apparently MS is working on so-called "honeypots" to lure dangerous websites and has theorized the development, eventually, of rootkits that operate as a virtual system below the threshold kernal level of an OS, completely taking over the operation of a machine, wholly unbeknownst to the user. Hence, my constant concern.

    I assume that AE provides a perfect defense against any executable, except for scripts, and I feel safer on the net with AE and DefenseWall. ProcessGuard gives me incredible control over how many and what kind of privileges I choose to give to the many running programs and services that I have and it is my central HIPS defense. Through the very installation of ProcessGuard I am getting a pretty good education as to just what is churning in the depths of my OS. As a last resort, I have FirstDefense to rely on, which I have relied on in the past, if my entire system crashes, assuming it isn't a hardware issue which, in fact, it may be.

    But, enough of my ramblings. I will reinstall PrivacyKeyboard, since I have it and it is very costly; so I feel compelled to use it, and once again, ever again, uninstall it, if -- again -- I run into a flurry of new windows errors and assorted glitches.

    If nothing else, I certainly must have one of the cleanest machines that did, alas, ever fail to run.
     
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