POP Proxy problem

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 2 Forum' started by nickpaton, Oct 4, 2006.

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  1. nickpaton

    nickpaton Registered Member

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    I use ISP ABC and for various reasons I need to check emails from my old ISP XYZ. I use Outlook Express for this.

    My ISP advised me that the POP3 setting is as per my gateway namely 127.0.0.1,

    and the SMTP, SMTP.ABC.net

    This worked fine with another well known antivirus program, however switching over to NOD32, when doing a send and receive, I get the following error message:

    I was advised by my ISP that the message indicates a POP Proxy such as an AV scanner running locally.

    I have tried disabling EMON (and the whole NOD32 program!) and also tried it on two PC's at different locations with the same results.

    All firewalls have also been disabled as well.

    How can I get around this please

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. alglove

    alglove Registered Member

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    127.0.0.1 as your gatewayo_O That is probably part of the problem right there. By convention, 127.0.0.1 is known as "localhost", and its purpose is to point straight back to your own computer. Unless you have an e-amil server running on your own computer, this will likely fail.

    Now, some antivirus programs filter e-mail by placing themselves between the user and the remote e-mail server. In effect, the antivirus program acts as a "pseudo-server" or "proxy", so it appears to Outlook Express that an e-mail server *is* running on your computer, and then the antivirus program does the work of contacting the remote e-mail server. In this case, the 127.0.0.1 arrangement would work, since this is how you access the antivirus program (so that it can access the server).

    However, NOD32 uses a different method to filter e-mail and webpages. For that reason, the 127.0.0.1 method will not work with NOD32. Instead, you should try using the POP3 server settings that is listed by your old XYZ ISP.

    Most ISP's these days will not let you send e-mail through their networks unless you are connected directly to them (in an effort to cut down on server hijacking for spamming purposes). However, many of them will let you check your e-mail, even when you are connected to another ISP. The exact policies vary from ISP to ISP, though.

    Is there any way you say who the old XYZ ISP is? I do not care about your exact e-mail address, just the ISP. I may be able to go to their website to see what they say about configuration.
     
  3. nickpaton

    nickpaton Registered Member

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    Many thanks for your very comprehensive reply, which has pointed me straight to the solution!

    You are right of course, in that I need the POP3 settings for the old ISP, which is LineOne BTW.

    Not that we should promote other companies as such, but my present ISP is 100% excellent in every respect and is a small(ish) UK based company called www.fireflyuk.net.

    Everything now works and many thanks indeed for your very quick reply and kind assistance!

    Nick
     
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