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Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by GroomLake, Feb 29, 2008.

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  1. GroomLake

    GroomLake Registered Member

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    I will tell you boys one more time to back up without any compression. If you are trying to do a restore of your image, that you know is good, and you get a message telling you that it is corrupt you may have to try the restore several times but it will eventually restore. If your memory is flaky it will eventually restore bur not if your image is compressed.
     
  2. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Sounds like a really good reason to replace bad memory.
     
  3. GroomLake

    GroomLake Registered Member

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    Assumptions:
    1. Your computer is working fine for the applications you are running.
    2. You have a backup image.
    3. Your OS hard drive fails.
    4. You do not know your memory is flakey.

    You replace your OS hard drive and attempt an image restore only to find that TI reports that the image is corrupt. You know the image is not corrupt. You try to restore it several times and find that it stops at different points. You know your image is not compressed and this seems odd to you. You try the restore 3 of 4 times until it eventually completes. You boot up and all seems to be fine.

    An experience user would probably remove or replace the failing memory bank if he suspects he has a problem with it.
     
  4. jonyjoe81

    jonyjoe81 Registered Member

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    This is one problem I've never encountered, and I encountered plenty. I always backup with the default "normal compression" and I backup through the windows interface(not bootcd), and I usually listen to an mp3 and surf the internet while backing up and use the calculater. All the backups I have done have retained all the data when restored.
     
  5. GroomLake

    GroomLake Registered Member

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    Maters not how the image was created and validated. I’m talking about doing image restores with flaky memory that you are unaware of at the time of the operation.
     
  6. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Flaky memory can be one of several reasons why a restore may fail. I notice that you have not specified whether you have run the latest Mem test or not.

    On very rare occasions I have had a restore fail with a corrupt archive message. As these were rare I did not worry too much as I have secondary and tertiary ways of recovery. However I then had a run of corrupt images reported so I investigated further.After passing Mem testsI suspected an IDE ribbon cable as it was rather tight and might be giving trouble. The replacement was no better. I eventually found a suspect connector in the 5.5Volt supply to the backup drive, the 12Volt supply was fine. I remade the wire connector joint in the socket and have had no problems whatsoever since then.

    What I am trying to get across is that it is pointless changing the level of compression when the problem probably is elsewhere. Running a reportedly corrupt restore several times till it eventually worked sounds like an amount of diligent investigation into the cause of the problem would be in order rather than clasping a straws.

    Xpilot
     
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