OpenBSD 4.1 Released!

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Alphalutra1, May 1, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    Okay, I know I am one of the few if any who use openbsd in this forum, especially as a desktop, but I would just let you guys know version 4.1 of the most secure operating system was released today.

    Here is the release information.

    If you feel like trying it out, I would like to let you know that it doesn't have the conventional download for the iso, you just get a small (around 5 MB) iso which will boot up and download all of the packages from the ftp mirror. However, it is definitely better to purchase the cds, and help support the project since it is the main fundraiser (all those who use OpenSSH should definitely at least donate to the project).

    Once you have the boot iso, just follow the steps in the FAQ on the website for installing and you should be good to go.

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  2. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Posts:
    2,642
    Location:
    Cymru
    Yup got it:thumb:

    Impressive,
    FAQ
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2007
  3. zorro zorrito

    zorro zorrito Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Posts:
    149
    How long does it take to download the packages? the basic packages.
    (100 kbs/s).
    Thanks
     
  4. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Yes, but who do i have to kill to learn OpenBSD?
    Don't take me wrong, i would love to use the most secure OS. But:

    1- how dificult is it? I guess there's that easier one you also mention, but is it as secure?
    2- what software packages are available here? Comparing to GNU.

    TIA
     
  5. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    Like to get the operating system up and running from the ftp install? Here is the ftp site where you can see all of the packages:

    ftp://ftp5.usa.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/4.1/i386/

    All the ones with .tgz will be the ones the cd would download and install during the installation. The sizes are listed next to them.


    Here is the installation guide for everybody. The hardest part is partitioning, and to do so, if you have a 15 GB partition, I recommend values of 150MB for /, 256MB for swap, 256MB for /tmp, 128MB for /var, 550MB for /home, and the rest for /usr. The /home partition is small because I usually have a data partition I share between operating systems (FAT32, ext2, or FFS filesystem). /usr is so large since it holds the entire source tree, ports system, and all applications installed.
     
  6. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    No killing is required, trust me ;)
    The biggest requirement is to be able to read, and I am not kidding. The manuals and FAQ's on the page are excellent, clear, and concise. There is also http://bsdforums.org/forums which have some forums orientated towards people new to it all, but it is always best to use google and the documentation on the website first.
    It really isn't too difficult once you get used to it. For example, there is a video on youtube where a person installs the entire thing in 5 minutes, which includes some configuring.

    Once you get past the partitioning, it is pretty simply to install and configure. To get xorg up and running, use either xorgconfig or X -configure, which is the standard for basically anything that uses xorg anyways.
    Since it has linux emulation built in (so it runs basically anything from linux), basically the same number of packages. Of course, most are native, and not from linux. There are two ways of installing (as you would discover in the FAQ), ports and packages. Packages are a binary way of installing things, while ports you compile from scratch and are more up to date for the most part. I run opera 9.2, which is the most current release, the most current vim, etc.

    It is really great out-of-the-box since it is configured to be secure from the start, not after a user tweaks the crap out of it. Also, the openbsd team applies many patches to applications to make them more secure. In addition, the newest version of xorg (7.2), is currently in the current branch, under the name xenocara, since the openbsd is making the code more portable, secure, and not only linux orientated like the Xorg project seems to be heading.

    As to other operating systems, I always like freebsd as well, it is faster, and has quicker development with features being added quicker and such, but it doesn't fit me as well as openbsd which I know will always be rock-solid and work, while I don't have that confidence with other operating systems (except freebsd, but the confidence isn't as strong). Also, freebsd has support for 3D acceleration and binary blobs, which if you need it to get your hardware working, then I would use freebsd over openbsd.

    Any more questions, and I will be glad to answer.

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  7. Cerxes

    Cerxes Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Posts:
    581
    Location:
    Northern Europe
    Thx! will check it out, even if I´m rather satisfied with DesktopBSD. But why have they choosed to use this method of having a small iso to download the rest? Why not use one image like the others? Just curious... /Cerxes.
     
  8. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Hey Alphalutra1, i just might try it. I'll have a go in VB.
    BTW, which is the OpenBSD symbol, the devil or the balloon fish?:D
     
  9. Cerxes

    Cerxes Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Posts:
    581
    Location:
    Northern Europe
    The ballon fish, the devil is for FreeBSD /C.
     
  10. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Thank you Cerxes. Last Q's:

    1-What's the relatitionship between BSD and Free Software? And Open Source.

    GNU.org states this:
    I don't know if it refers to BSD elsewhere, there could be a more elaborate opinion, i don't know.
    Wikipedia:
    I suppose the only license diference would be the rejection by BSD project of the "copyleft". It is free software anyway, but the code can be incorporated in proprietary software, rejecting copyleft.

    2- This is actually a follow-up, where are the fundamental differences between FreeBSD, Open BSD, NetBSD.. concerning licenses, operation, security, etc.

    If there's a decent link discussing it, i'll gladly read it. But i'd like your take on it.


    TIA :D

     
  11. Cerxes

    Cerxes Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Posts:
    581
    Location:
    Northern Europe
    1. You answered partly your own question. A good example of this is Apples Mac OS X that derive from BSD/Darwin.

    2. Fundamental differences: FreeBSD - performance and stability, NetBSD - portability, OpenBSD - security and standardization.

    www.bsdforums.org

    /Cerxes.
     
  12. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    BSD is definitely pro-open source without a doubt. Most BSD's use the Three-Clause BSD license, which basically states that as long as you give complete credit to the writer of the code, you can do whatever you want with it (not completely accurate summary, but you can read the license, it is quite short, simple, and more straight to the point then GPL).

    Also, compared to GPL, the BSD license doesn't have the "viral" clause where once something is under GPL it has to stay that way or else it is broken, which causes some difficultiese sometimes unfortunately.

    Okay, all though what I am saying is complete over-generalization for each project, it will help a bit.

    OpenBSD has the main goal of security, clean code, and good code. They are pro-BSD and anti-GPL for stuff they use (mainly because they rewrite all the GPL stuff into shorter and better code under the BSD :p ). Here are the project goals according to them.

    NetBSD always has aimed at being the most portable bsd. It runs on sooo many different architectures and computers it is ridiculous. Beyond this though, they also place a heavy emphasis on security (though not completely to the extent of Open), but extend this security to there ports system, called pkgsrc, which can be used on a variety of platforms (even windows through SFU, and linux). Here is their about page with many links. The one thing that sets them apart is that I believe they still use the 4-clause BSD license, and that they still have xfree as default (more portable and lightweight).

    FreeBSD always comes across to me as more bleeding-edge and with faster development with new features added more quickly. Also, there is an heavier emphasis on speed and performance. It has the largest userbase and the most number of developers. It to me is a more realistic desktop system, due to the larger hardware support, more emphasis on speed, and the fact that since it is the most popular, some companies even release drivers for it such as nvidia. Here is their about page.

    Although that probably isn't the best description or the most accurate, that is what they have come across to me as I have used them and messed around.

    And BTW, I just upgraded my OpenBSD system from 4.0 to 4.1, which was my first upgrade, and it was sooo easy to do. In the tradition of BSD geeks, I will attach my dmesg to brag to all others :D If you look closely enough, you will see that Theo (the main devel) even built my kernel since I am using the one from the upgrade :p

    Also, it is not a balloon fish, it is a puffer fish (named Puffy) so give it some respect ;)

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Posts:
    2,642
    Location:
    Cymru
    Hi,
    you should get what you want mostly from the openbsd faq.

    I've used openbsd as a gateway, router, firewall, ip masquerade/ip filter (ipnat), network, server... Everything you'll need is there.
     
  14. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Posts:
    2,642
    Location:
    Cymru
    :D :D
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Thanks for the details:thumb: . So my take on it is BSD license refers to free software. It is what it is. They only reject copyleft, which is not a pre-requisite for the definition. It's a defense for free to stay free.

    I don't know if i agree with them on droping copyleft, it would be a reassurance they stay on top of things.. But i admit i have to read more to form a better opinion.
    I didn't mean to disrespect. I didn't realize the balloon fish was bad (i do know however it has poison).
    Puffy it is :)

    EDIT: Meriadoc, Liverpool? U sure?:D
     
  16. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
  17. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Posts:
    2,642
    Location:
    Cymru
    Hey nice:thumb: :D dunno about that soundtrack though. I have Sabayon that has a soundtrack when installing.
    All my life;) . Well up north Liverpool aint far across the water and at our side some people have a Welsh/Scouse accent.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2007
  18. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    :) It's his soundtrack, even he says it's crap, at least the ending.

    OK, i've been reading from here, but it doesn't hold my hand, then i found this. I've booted from the cd41.iso found in the OpenBSD/4.1/i386 directory (in whatever your choice of mirror), and i'm following the directions on the handsholder site. (right now i just want to see it through:D ).
     
  19. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Ok, that site is partitioning as if i had 40 GB. I only gave 15 dynamic GB to the HD in VB, as Alphalutra said. To partition like that, how do i input MB?
    g- GB ; m- MB??
     
  20. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    here is the official OpenBSD install guide (as linked in a previous post ;)

    For almost all your documentation needs, go to FAQ or the manual pages.

    If you typed in ? at the prompt for disklabel, you would have gotten a list of the commands and such. One of the descriptions says that 'm' stands for megabytes

    Also, you can check out of the manual page for disklabel and fdisk in my link above for more detailed info.

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  21. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    Thanks. Actually, i stumbled upon the ? comand, and used m for megabytes.

    But now i can't retrieve the list for ftp.
    This is actually a previous problem i have with VirtualBox, or VMware for that matter. I can't connect. When installing Debian, i downloaded the packages normally, but then booting the installed Debian, no browsing..

    But now i'm pretty sure i gave the wrong directions to OpenBSD.

    I have a router, and i connect to it for DNS too. I don't have DNS IP's on XP. So what i did was point to my router for DNS, gateway, the works. I don't even get a prompt from Comodo, so something's wrong with this, my already short knowledge just gets shorter.

    I really got to rush my pending affairs and install Debian on my laptop. I got to a point where i don't know where i messed up XP.
     
  22. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    Sounds like DHCP isn't working on your computer. Make sure the DHCP service is enabled (Start->run->"services.msc"->DHCP something, enable, set to automatic) and that your router is actually handing out addresses to everyone with no MAC filtering since that can screw stuff up.

    Hopefully that will help

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  23. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Posts:
    3,502
    DHCP was on, but now i see, i had the option to use DHCP...:oops:
    It found the list, now i'm having problem with some mirrors. Good thing i have snapshots when things go wrong. This time it's not necessary, it's asking location of sets again.

    Thanks Alphalutra1
     
  24. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Posts:
    8,695
    Hello,
    Alpha, a tricky question:
    Can you configure a PPTP or L2TP dialer with the installer? If not so, then I could install it only on one of the lanned /smoothwalled machines and not with direct Internet access....
    Mrk
     
  25. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Posts:
    2,642
    Location:
    Cymru
    Still having connection problems Pedro?

    _______________________________________________________

    (You can dial in, PPTP, I've configured with Poptop.)
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.