NSA has direct access to tech giants' systems for user data, secret files reveal

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Dermot7, Jun 6, 2013.

  1. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Hahahahaha good one!!
     
  2. siljaline

    siljaline Registered Member

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    Glad you liked :thumb:

     
  3. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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    No, this is just smart journalism. If you listen to Greenwald in his press interviews, he's not shy about admitting "there's a lot more to come".




    This is just how you do it. (While it's not entirely the same type of exposé, this is an instructive example.)
     
  4. siljaline

    siljaline Registered Member

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  5. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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  6. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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  7. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    Google Asks U.S. Government For Permission To Publish Aggregate Number Of National Security Requests It Receives:
    http://techcrunch.com/2013/06/11/go...-fisa-national-security-requests-it-receives/
     
  8. siljaline

    siljaline Registered Member

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  9. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    It would be fun if "they" could name a few cases when PRISM or any similar system actually played a big role in tracking down the bad guy/s.

    Like did they take advantage of PRISM data when they tracked the "Boston bombers" down as an recent example.....
     
  10. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    Thanks, NSA: Sales of Orwell's 1984 rise 9500% on Amazon:
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/12/orwell_1984_sales_rocket/
     
  11. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    NSA accused of new crimes ... against slideware:
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/12/nsa_accused_of_crimes_against_slideware/
     
  12. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    How NSA spooks spaffed my DAD'S DATA ALL OVER THE WEB:
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/12/nsa_logo_scandal/
     
  13. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    Justice Dept. weighs Google's request to lift NSA gag order:
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-5...weighs-googles-request-to-lift-nsa-gag-order/
     
  14. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    1. Zero.

    2. Nope. Paper Book from the State Department. Never mind the fact that the FBI knew who they were prior. They watched and interviewed about the older brother.

    "They" are trying to say that 2 cases were, but it's lie. The first was relayed by British Intelligence, and the second was one of their own informants that they were controlling...and the attack happened anyway - Mumbai.

    Boston happened too. Great job this stuff does. It's evil, there is no justification.

    PD
     
  15. Dermot7

    Dermot7 Registered Member

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    https://www.computerworld.com/s/art...ism_answers_from_U.S._AG_Holder?taxonomyId=17
    http://www.technologyreview.com/new...mplying-with-nsas-prism-may-face-eu-lawsuits/
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
  16. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    Senate Committee Confronts NSA Director on Surveillance:
    http://threatpost.com/senate-committee-confronts-nsa-director-on-surveillance/
     
  17. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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    What the NSA can do with “big data”:
    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/06/what-the-nsa-can-do-with-big-data/
     
  18. siljaline

    siljaline Registered Member

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    NSA performed over 61K hacking operations around the world, says whistleblower
    See: http://venturebeat.com/2013/06/12/nsa-global-surveillance/
     
  19. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    Snowden is done. Being fired is about to be the least of his problems. This guy will end up in the darkest hole the government can find and the key melted before his eyes. Iceland won't be able to protect the guy if they wanted to (I get a feeling they don't want to wade through this minefield). You can also expect things like the Freedom of Information Act to be dealt severe blows. All the old Wikileaks scandals have nothing on this sucker. *Shrug* People were warned that this stuff was going on, but no, we have the Constitution, we have rights, they can't do it to citizens. Yeah? They just did, and after the fires die down, since no one can "check up" on them, it'll happen again. There are plenty of PRISMs to go around.

    Click your heels three times folks, see if it's all just a bad dream.
     
  20. siljaline

    siljaline Registered Member

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  21. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    Of course they are. So much focus is being put on Verizon, but as we've seen, Verizon logs are a teardrop in an ocean of what the NSA and others are watching and collecting. Google and the rest are privately having sleepless nights, but in public they don't have a choice but to deny everything. For one thing it could ruin them, but a bigger reason is that the NSA has, rest assured, threatened these companies into keeping their traps shut.

    Coverage in the mainstream is already dying down, unfortunately, from what I'm seeing, save for the usual "use a VPN/yada yada" which won't do a bit of good for things like this. Citizen and media apathy are the reasons things like this happen.
     
  22. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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    Yeah that's a good angle I don't see being discussed much. When you look at it from a foreigner perspective, it's quite bad. First you have the user perspective, discussed here. As he describes, there's a lot the foreign user of US tech services now has to consider, moving forward.

    But what's of even greater consequence is the business client implications...

    How many foreign firms go through US tech giants for some of their storage or computing or some other service? A lot of them are going to be looking for ways to transition elsewhere.


    Greenwald has said there's a lot more coming, so it'll get stretched out for a while.
     
  23. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Please say more about that. Maybe one-hop VPNs wouldn't do much good, but I'm not convinced that VPN->Tor->VPN chaining wouldn't slow them down considerably, at least.
     
  24. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    @Jackman G: I too think that foreign tech/business needs will take a lot more consideration before putting them in the hands of U.S companies. I'm fairly sure U.S companies will go further, if they can, to protect themselves.

    @Mirimir: Well, think about it for a moment. Do you know that a VPN service provider doesn't let LEA or the NSA funnel traffic through their servers? Do you know that the privacy policies on the website are accurate when they say "no spying/logging"? Do you know that the nodes in TOR you connect to, even the entry point, is not an NSA-ran node? It only takes one time time of going through a government-ran VPN or connecting to the wrong node, no matter how many "hops" you make afterward. I realize all this sounds very "conspiracy theorist", but if anyone is paying even the slightest amount of attention and thinking things through, I think we can safely say that many of the conspiracy nuts and people who have tried to warn of these things, weren't so crazy after all.

    The world isn't going to end based on all this going on, but I highly suggest that people start thinking about the services they rely on for privacy and security, and stop being complacent and leaving their privacy and safety in the hands of others.
     
  25. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    @Mman79

    Yes, assessing TLA capabilities is hard.

    However, in order to know that I was using Tor, an adversary would need to compromise either the initial (pre-Tor) or final (post-Tor) VPN provider(s). Even then, tracing my Tor circuits would be very difficult unless my Tor client had picked entry guard(s) that the adversary hosted.

    I'm not claiming that TLAs couldn't manage that. I'm just arguing that it would be nontrivial.

    Adversaries with access to global traffic data could, of course, trace my browsing and posting on (for example) Wilders back to my ISP gateway. Then they'd know what to go after. But that would also be nontrivial.
     
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