Not revealing your password, a criminal offense in UK

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by llista, Jul 13, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. llista

    llista Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Posts:
    19
    Location:
    European Union
    The British police is getting the right to demmand the password to your encrypted data, the penalty for refusing to reveal your password carries a jail sentence.

    The Part III of the Ripa Act (UK) will come into force 1st October:
    http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2193876/government-ripa-part-iii

    Forgetting it is not a valid excuse as you will have to prove you have forgotten it, not the other way around, and if after revealing all your private data the police decides in fact you had nothing illegal encrypted, there will be no compensation. Welcome to Big Brother Britain.
     
  2. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Posts:
    2,295
    Location:
    Cromwell Country
    Good to hear. Its about time we took the gloves off when dealing with terrorists.
    They can inspect my data anytime without paying compensation.
     
  3. llista

    llista Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Posts:
    19
    Location:
    European Union
    You probably don't know much about terrorists and "taking off the gloves", in my country of origin where the terrorists are far much more numerous and powerful than in the UK, the police usually tortures them with electric cathodes, beatings, raping the female militants, and threats to kill their families. I am not making this up, all this is well documented in the annual Amnesty International report.

    This system has been working excellent for the last 40 years and 100% of the terrorists always sign confessions with all the details, hard disk encryption it is irrelevant once you have a signed confession with all the details.

    But wee UK believes that terrorists will prefer to betray the cause they are ready to die for and their comrades rather than facing prison, which is rubbish. If you are going to fight terrorism you do it the right way.

    I am all for legalisation of torture of terrorists and their families, but the Ripa Act will help in nothing.
     
  4. argus tuft

    argus tuft Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Posts:
    280
    Location:
    Australia
    So, searching through private data = A Bad Thing
    State sanctioned torture = A Good Thing?

    Just trying to understand...
     
  5. MikeNash

    MikeNash Security Expert

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Posts:
    1,654
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    A friend of mine came up with a cute idea. Set your password to something like "ICommittedCriminalOffenceXXXXXXonDDDD"... then use the right not to self-incriminate to hand over the password. It raised a smile, but I am unsure how effective it would be.

    The problem with giving sweeping powers to inspect data is the fact that the data is inspected by people. People who have power tend to abuse it.

    ... until you, or a member of your family are falsely accused of being a terrorist, in which case I assume you would sign anything to make the pain stop... I just hope you were being sarcastic in your post :(



    [NB. This is a personal post and not the view of my employer]
     
  6. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Posts:
    17,878
    Location:
    New England
    Torture & Politics - definitely two things that are not appropriate for Wilders Security Forums.

    As we've had both a Pro- and Con- posting on those, which gives the thread a measure of balance, I'm going to close the thread now to prevent that from being carried any further. People can read the article at the link provided and then contemplate the issue for themselves offline from this forum.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.