non-system disk error and dive not initialized

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by barkingmonkeye, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. barkingmonkeye

    barkingmonkeye Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2015
    Posts:
    2
    Hey all, I have an interesting problem that im about to just give up on but thought id toss it out here because there seems to be some bright people in this forum.

    I got a complaint about a HP desktop with a non-system disk error and wouldn't boot. This is a windows 7 OS with bit locked intel pro 1500 SSD. First thing I did was plug the drive into another windows 7 PC via a usb adapter, it recognized the drive in disk mgmt. but its status was not initialized and thus wasn't prompting to unlock with the bit locker key.

    So I slave it directly to the motherboard on a different windows 7 pc and has the same issue, its not detecting any of the partitions and only options are to initialize and format. So in my haste being the dummy that I am sometimes, I initialized and formatted the drive with the thought that I could just recover the partition/data using recovery software. I did run a scan on the drive using intel SSD toolbox and it completes without error so im not sure exactly what happened to the drive.

    Well that didn't pan out well. Ive tried to use a couple recovery programs like iCare data recovery and UFS Explorer, and they are able to see the old partition but there they don't find any data there. Im assuming its because the partition is/was encrypted.

    My questions are, is there still a way to access the data in a situation like this? Is there a way to investigate why the drive crashed in the first place? What would be the first steps I should have taken in this scenario?
     
  2. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Posts:
    569
    Location:
    USA
    It's encrypted. That means nothing can read it which 'smart' recovery programs will try to do. A good recovery program (like R-Studio) might recover the encrypted partitions (RAW) for you.

    How was BitLocker implemented? Does the desktop have a TPM?

    Do a memtest86+ on the desktop.
     
  3. barkingmonkeye

    barkingmonkeye Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2015
    Posts:
    2
    Hi and thanks for the reply :)

    Bit locker was implemented via an automated package which AFAIK silently turns bit locker on and starts the encrypting, and uploads a copy of the key to an AD server. I do have the key, but wasnt sure how to get the drive to allow me to access the encrypted partition since the partition seemed to be toast. Yes, the desktop has a TPM chip and bit locker is tied to it, but not sure that's an issue because i have the bit locker key.

    I dont normally use memtest86+, are you saying that the SSD encrypted partition may have corrupted due to faulty RAM?
     
Loading...