NOD32 detecting spywares and ad

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 2 Forum' started by rie3, Oct 7, 2004.

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  1. rie3

    rie3 Guest

    As I can see by update log list on Eset website NOD32 added Gator, WhenYouSave and other ad parasites.
    Does it mean that NOD detect spywares and ad parasites now?
     
  2. Sweetie(*)(*)

    Sweetie(*)(*) Registered Member

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    Hi my understanding is that Nod32 will detect some spyware, namely the illegal unsolicited software.eg force downloads.
    If it comes with an end user license agreement, it will not be detected unless deemed unsafe. You need to tick the potentially dangerous applications box in your set up options for it to work.

    By no means stop using your stand alone spyware scanner, the update to detect dangerous applications does not pick up all spyware.
     
  3. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    Neither, unfortunately, does much of the current anti-spyware. Here are some chastening, recent test results of anti-spyware performance. 75% success is not the worst, but the best performance.

    http://spywarewarrior.com/asw-test-results-1.htm
     
  4. Sweetie(*)(*)

    Sweetie(*)(*) Registered Member

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    That test was preformed on a pc running Win 2000.
    So the results can not be compared to Win XP based pc's.

    Beware of online software comparisons, as alot are just paid adverts.
     
  5. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    While you may draw some comfort from the fact the tests are run on W2K and not XP, I certainly do not; nor has anyone else I have encountered who is familiar with the test results. I think your insinuation that Eric L. Howes' is providing little more than paid avertising is unfortunate. Hopefull, when you take time to read the material providied on the web site, you will withdraw it.
     
  6. Sweetie(*)(*)

    Sweetie(*)(*) Registered Member

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    Below are quotes from the Spyware test web site.


    "Given these limitations, readers should not regard the test results reported here as any kind of "definitive" guide to anti-Spyware scanners"

    "The tests results report only actual removals of a select number of "critical" files and Registry keys, and thus do not give a complete account of the removals performed by any of the anti-Spyware scanners tested." [end quote]


    As some of the test files used were programs that require an End User License Agreement the Anti Spyware scanners can not be blamed for the lack of detection.

    Legally adding detections that form part of a program that has an EULA is a very fine line, as Lavasoft found out with NEW.NET software. Even though NEW.NET is regarded as Spyware, they sued Lavasoft for loss of revenue as a result of being added to Adaware's detection list.

    One of the main software components of the test was Grockster which comes with an EULA, therefore making it illegal to add detections for some of the components of that program.
     
  7. Sweetie(*)(*)

    Sweetie(*)(*) Registered Member

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    I didn't Insinuate anything.
     
  8. Blackspear

    Blackspear Global Moderator

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    While in general I understand your point, this is not the case here, Eric L. Howes' has performed a very balanced and well rounded test, the results are valid and speak for themselves…


    Hi Howard, it would be better to try and not make your words too strong, you have a valid point, however we want to keep things running in harmony here ;)

    Cheers :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2004
  9. Randy_Bell

    Randy_Bell Registered Member

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    I personally think it unreasonable to expect the AV to also act as AT/AS and detect the Kitchen Sink. There will always be a place for specialized antitrojan {AT} and antispyware {AS} apps. The AV needs to specialize on classic malware {virus, worm, some but not all trojan} and add these other adware-spyware detections if consumers want that, but not at expense of its primary function which is to stop the classic malware. ;)
     
  10. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    Point taken I am in week three of giving up smoking, so I am a little sharper than usual :)
     
  11. Blackspear

    Blackspear Global Moderator

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    No problem at all Howard, and all the very best in your hard task ahead, keep at it, it will get better, the future is clearer when the smoke has gone... :D

    Cheers :D
     
  12. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    I completely agree with what you have written. Unfortunately, there seems to be a tendency in software development to transform programmes into the all singing and dancing suite/application. We saw it with web browsers (the Firefox development is a nice exception to this), we see it with software firewalls and we are seeing it with a-v programmes. I like the unfussy dedicated utilities, which are only there, as far as I am concerned, to clear up any silly mistake I may have made in the way I have been using my pc. I still believe that if you use your pc with a modicum of informed common sense, then it is possible to remain infected without the use of various anti-spyware, anti-Trojans and a-v programmes. Of course, I use all three, but more for my peace of mind than for protection in the absolute sense (I think that makes sense :) )
     
  13. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    Um, that should, of course, read "remain uninfected" (serves me right for posting when I was in a rush)
     
  14. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Thanks for the laugh Howard! :D
     
  15. halcyon

    halcyon Registered Member

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    It's not illegal to add signatures for programs that have an EULA.

    Or perhaps you might get legal trouble for doing that in the USA, but illegal it is not.

    And one won't get any trouble in most other western countries.

    As an example, in various countries non-changeable one-way fixed EULAs have no legal binding power.

    You can click yes all you want and it still won't bind you to anything.

    As for the spyware test, it's surely not paid and it's the best there is.

    Of course, it's possible to do better.

    Anybody here want to do it for free, like Eric did?

    Didn't think so :)

    Of course I'd be happy if Nod-32 also detected/cleaned all spyware, malware, trojans and virii in the world, but being that it would probably make the program a huge resource hog, really slow and cost at least twice as much, I think I'll pass :)
     
  16. dvk01

    dvk01 Global Moderator

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    Anjti viruses DO need to detect & prevent the installation of a lot of spyware/adware now

    In the real world there are very few NEW true viruses around, but quite a few worms & trojans and a lot of new spyware/adware.

    Many of the worms/trojans have an adware component and can cause quite a lot of damage to the compter when they are removed incorrectly.

    So yes Antivirus companies DO need to include detection for these major problems and prevent them being installed in the first place.

    We see more infected computers with spyware/adware than we do with "old fashioned" viruses & worms/trojans

    probably in the ratio of 5 or 6 adwares to 1 virus

    so that makes adwares/spywares the main target at the moment
     
  17. Howard

    Howard Registered Member

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    My HOSTS file currently has more than 26000 entries to block adware, hijackers and other parasites. It is not, of course, a definitive listing, but it keeps plenty of rubbish off my system without relying on a-v software to detect it.
     
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