No more individual patches for Windows 7 and 8

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by emmjay, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. NormanF

    NormanF Registered Member

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    In Windows 7, you can simply disable the Update Service or hide the cumulative patch and tell Microsoft to go ** itself.

    You're not obligated to update at all.
     
  2. Oleg

    Oleg Registered Member

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    After Rollup installation. Will we be able to choose what update we would like to uninstall or it would be all-in one?. For example Service Pack(s) where you don't have a chose of updates implemented into Service Pack?.
     
  3. JRViejo

    JRViejo Super Moderator

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    http://www.pcworld.com/article/3108...tive-monthly-rollups-starting-in-october.html
     
  4. Oleg

    Oleg Registered Member

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    Hopefully there is going to be a 3rd party app that would allow us to customize Rollup updates. By the way thanks JRViejo for a straight-forward link to the article.
     
  5. JRViejo

    JRViejo Super Moderator

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    Oleg, you're welcome! Take care.
     
  6. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    To be honest, you don't have full control on Linux updates (sorta). Once you install a certain set of programs, you're pretty much obligated to update them, otherwise you'll bork the OS (good luck maintaining a non-updated important program/library like libc6). While on Windows you can never update a program and it will work forever (because it's libraries are inside the program's folder and mostly not shared with the OS, or the program doesn't care of OS's libraries are newer), you can't do the same on Linux because of how programs use a global set of libraries.

    That is the only downside of Linux updates. You can chose to never update Linux, you'll never receive forced updates for things you don't need, you'll never get malware/spyware updates... but you're forced to update all programs (unless you're running a "stable model" distro, which most are).
     
  7. SuperSapien

    SuperSapien Registered Member

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    I would recommend Linux Mint or Linux Lite since there both user very friendly and aimed towards Windows users.

    Thanks JRViejo I feel a little more at ease now.


    Agreed amarildojr but like you said Linux wont install any spyware with the updates.
     
  8. ProTruckDriver

    ProTruckDriver Registered Member

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    Thank you @SuperSapien :)
     
  9. SuperSapien

    SuperSapien Registered Member

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    Your wlcome ProTruckDriver, one note though your still going to have to use the terminal occasionally thats one downside to most Linux distros unlike Android and I don't think Chrome OS needs you to use the terminal. BTW theres a desktop version of Android called Remix OS but its still in its testing stages.
     
  10. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    It's what I meant about Linux. I trust Linux updates: Linux community works for the development of the OS and the defense of the users, but I suspect of this - and others - Microsoft operation.
     
  11. rm22

    rm22 Registered Member

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    I put Ubuntu on an old XP PC back in January to try it out - I've used Linux in the past, but only at work/school with IT support. My take, on Ubuntu at least, is that it's most suitable for the "default" users (they'll use it as installed) and the "uber geeks". One big reason being that very little functionality is incorporated into the GUI - so if you just install the OS as is, install Apps from your respective 'store', and your hardware happens to be compatible - then it's all fine, but if you need to tinker - say harden the OS, or something is broken, it gets ugly fast - the learning curve is massive compared to Windows and the support (tutorials / how-to's ) are sparse.

    I'll keep playing with it, but unfortunately so far for me Linux is not a workable replacement for Windows on my main PCs
     
  12. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    Agree. The most important reason to no switch, for me, is that i can't try an email client for Linux able to convert all my Incredimail emails: I don't want to lose my emails !
     
  13. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    Can't try or can't find? There are standards for email such that the messages themselves should export from one email client and import into another very easily. If Incredimail doesn't have an export/save feature, is there an export/migrate tool available somewhere?

    Did a search for fun, this may give you some ideas: http://email.about.com/od/incredimailtips/qt/How_to_Export_Mail_from_IncrediMail_to_Another_Email_Program.htm
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2016
  14. ChrisFerro3

    ChrisFerro3 Registered Member

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    I'm also looking for a better solution then Windows 8.1, it's becoming a problem now.
     
  15. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    Can't find, sorry, it was a mistake. Thank you for your link. I searched for some export tool more times in the past. Some years ago I found a software, like IncrediConvert, that exported the EML format in Outlook Express, but OE died with XP. I use Seven now: it would be intricate to export my emails from Seven to an old pc with XP and Incredimail, convert them in OE, and then to find a Linux email client that allow the email import from an OE backup...
     
  16. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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  17. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    Thank you again. Yes, really I too always thought that Incredimail developers wanted prevent users from export the emails.
     
  18. Krysis

    Krysis Registered Member

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    Not impressed with the 'all or nothing' approach by Microsoft – will see how this new rollup methodology pans out. If it turns out that I can install only security updates, fine, otherwise I'll just disable Windows updates!
     
  19. razorboy

    razorboy Registered Member

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    Two things - the Windows Update Running Nightmare and the Blitzkrieg For Windows 10 - have me finally getting enough energy to head for Linux Mint. The date of this move will be decided by (1) the end-of-support date for Windows 7 Home Premium, and (2) whether I can get W7 to update at all. I'm at the point where I don't much care if it updates or not.

    BTW: my local computer store people say that support for W7 Pro ends in 2020, lesser versions end in 2017.
     
  20. razorboy

    razorboy Registered Member

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    Another "By The Way:" I went looking for the Microsoft Update Catalog and I found a zillion news sites featuring the same story: Microsoft's .Net Framework will get its own Patch Tuesday. Dated 16 August 2016.
     
  21. razorboy

    razorboy Registered Member

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    Hah! """Administrators for Window 7 and Windows 8 Pro and Enterprise editions attached to an update server will get a few more options as they can independently manage whether security or feature-based rollups are installed, but Home users are out of luck."""

    Forbes, Windows 10 Worst Feature To Install On Windows 7 And Windows 8
     
  22. Stupendous Man

    Stupendous Man Registered Member

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    @razorboy,

    The Forbes article says,
    But one element that is in the original TechNet blog article was not mentioned in the Forbes article.
    Regarding Security-only updates, the TechNet blog article says:
    So, any user could download the Security-only updates through Microsoft Update Catalog.
     
  23. safeguy

    safeguy Registered Member

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    Those who wish for more control can use tools like WSUS Offline Update and Portable Update.
     
  24. NormanF

    NormanF Registered Member

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    Windows is moving towards package management like in Linux.

    If you've ever run a Linux update there are lot of packages pulled in you don't even want.

    Same thing Microsoft is doing here.
     
  25. Gullible Jones

    Gullible Jones Registered Member

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    I had a long rant about this, but I deleted it...

    For now my take is:

    a) Making it easier to keep Windows fully patched is a very, very good thing.

    b) Further workarounds for the dire bugs affecting Win7 updates are very, very welcome.

    c) I sure hope Microsoft has improved their quality control in the last few years.

    Sure, I'm not using Windows, but most of the desktop world is. I applaud anything that makes it easier for "normal" people to use Windows PCs without getting compromised and exploited six ways to Sunday.

    (That said, I fully expect Microsoft to blow it on this, as I've seen them blow it on almost everything.)
     
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