No Anonymity For Visiting Website and Viewing Video

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Mar 5, 2011.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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  2. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    Umm. Okay. This is one of the few rulings that actually makes me angry. I usually use Tor to access anything where I want to be anonymous, but this is the type of thing that I might watch without Tor out of curiosity. I don't even have a PS3, but I still might watch this.

    I'm just going to stop typing now before I say something I'll regret and end up before a judge. I have plenty to say, but nothing that can be adequately conveyed without expletives.
     
  3. nix

    nix Registered Member

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  4. SteveTX

    SteveTX Registered Member

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    Expect it. You have no rights which you cannot forcibly exercise, that is what makes the truth of those rights self-evident.
     
  5. cm1971

    cm1971 Registered Member

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    So does that mean anyone that just viewed the video has anything to worry about? What if someone viewed it that doesn't even have a PS3? This is a dangerous ruling indeed.
     
  6. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    Very unlikely they would have anything to worry about. It seems they just want the locations of visitors for purposes of legal proceedings against George Hotz, the guy who post the instructions (while exercising his first amendment rights BTW).

    It still makes me mad. It's up to Sony's discretion what they want to do with this personal information.
     
  7. cm1971

    cm1971 Registered Member

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    I don't like the fact that they have been given all this personal information either and I didn't even view the video or go to the web site. They treat Sony like they are a law enforcement organization.
     
  8. nix

    nix Registered Member

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    If Blue Host was smart, they would challenge that subpoena. The judge rejected Electronic Frontier Foundation's argument that the third party subpoenas sought by Sony were over broad. But he also found that EFF had burdened the court with an unpermitted amicus letter brief, so he would have rejected their argument anyway.

    Blue Host and the others should take a stand, and submit technical evidence on how the logged IPs may only marginally contribute to the question of proper jurisdiction. At the very least, SECA should have to show exactly how they intend to break down the IP evidence. Also, if George Hotz had published his work in a distributed textbook, it's doubtful that a judge would force, say, Blue Host Bookstore or library to turn over their reader lists, since there might be way less intrusive ways, again, to determine jurisdiction.
     
  9. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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  10. x942

    x942 Guest

    Sony fails lately. I don't care if they get my IP or not as I live in Canada and its 100% legal here to mod your console. (Mod chips can also legally be bought and sold here). I do feel bad for these Dev's though they haven't done anything legally wrong. I doubt sony will win this.

    If I or anyone reading this decides to post any homebrew you make or want to visit these sites I advise you grab a copy of T(A)ILS This is The (Amnesiac) Icognito Live System It forces all network traffic through TOR. I use it to connect to a proxy and then to the site ;)
     
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