New VeraCrypt Version Released

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by JRViejo, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    VeraCrypt v1.23 Hotfix (September 20, 2018)
    Website
    Download (SourceForge)
     
  2. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    VeraCrypt v1.23 Hotfix 2 (October 10, 2018)
    Website
    Announcement
    Download (SourceForge)
     
  3. ExtremeGamerBR

    ExtremeGamerBR Registered Member

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  4. Rasheed187

    Rasheed187 Registered Member

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    Guys, I'm a complete noob when it comes to encryption. How do you use such a tool like VeraCrypt, is it to encrypt only certain folders, or does it encrypt all data on shutdown?
     
  5. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    1) You can create an encrypted file container (for example: c:\users\rasheed187\data). After "mounting" it (for example on D:) you can place your secret files on D:
    If you unmount it, D: is gone and everyone can only see the "innocently looking file" c:\users\rasheed187\data

    2) You can create an encrypted partition. In this case the whole partition is encrypted.
    The same as above, after mounting it to a drive letter you have access to your files.

    3) a) The system partition (C:) can be encrypted. And without entering of a correct password in the VeraCrypt Boot Loader, the OS which resides in the encrypted partiton cannot be booted.
    3) b) The entire system drive can be encrypted

    You also have the option to create a hidden volume or even a hidden OS.
    What will be mounted depends on what password you are entering.
    If you are "forced" to enter a password, you can now use the password for your (only if created) "decoy OS" or decoy volume.
     
  6. Yuki2718

    Yuki2718 Registered Member

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    Probably your use is to encrypt files before uploading them to cloud on Windows, right? Then probably Cryptomator (or alternatively BoxCryptor) will be better suited.
    As mood has explained, VC mount a file as a virtual drive, but if you sync many files the container file have to be large. Mine is several GBs so syncing takes hours, and as it is a single file when you'd changed only 1 file in it whole container have to be reuploaded.
    Cryptomator also uses virtual drive, but its not a single file. All files are individually encrypted (file/folder name is also encrypted, but note you can't hide approximate file size) so if you change only 1 then only that file will be reuploaded.
    I don't have any experience for CM nor BC so might be wrong in details, but had used similar program called encfs (it's Windows folk was again (2nd time) deprecated so I don't recommend it for you). Both are free except for CM on mobile costs a bit.
     
  7. Rasheed187

    Rasheed187 Registered Member

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    OK thanks for the info. So I guess it makes sense to only put important files inside the encrypted partition. But will these files be accessible almost instantly?

    Thanks will check them out. But no, my intention was to protect data in case desktop or laptop gets stolen.
     
  8. Yuki2718

    Yuki2718 Registered Member

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    OK, then there can be some options depending on how much security you need. Encrypting system partition or whole drive as mood mentioned is one, and as you said, separate impo data and save them in encrypted drive or encrypted container is another, tho it's less secure as your OS will record metadata such as file path and timestamp for them, and swap or hibernation may save them in plain text temporary.

    I don't know what you mean by instantly, but you have to type password every time you want to first access them, then VC will 'stretch' your pwd (u can ctrl how long it takes tho), then finally you get. Once decrypted, it's unnoticeable in modern processor regardless if your CPU support AES-NI.
     
  9. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    To find out what maximum speed (encryption/decryption) you can expect, you can use the "Tools - Benchmark -> VeraCrypt - Algorithms Benchmark"
    And Features like Parallelization, Pipelining or Hardware Acceleration can speed up the process of encryption/decryption in addition.

    Most probably you won't "feel" any difference if you are accessing encrypted containers/partitions.
     
  10. Rasheed187

    Rasheed187 Registered Member

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    Basically, what if you want access to let's say 300GB of data, will this take some time to decrypt? And is there any risk of loosing data when you make use of encryption?
     
  11. Yuki2718

    Yuki2718 Registered Member

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    That depends on your architecture (CPU, AES-NI, your HDD/SSD's I/O) but regardless of size it'll unlikely you notice perf degradation, unless your PC is super old & low-end. Usually key-stretching when you've entered pwd is the most time-consuming part unless you adjust param called PIM.
    Other than obvious case you forgot pwd, yes, such thing can happen and we've seen occasionally someone come here and cry. So if you chose system encryption, make sure to create VC rescue disk (IDK much about GPT/UEFI tho). If you chose container, create header backup and save it in safe place. VC uses XTS mode encryption that means even when a part of your data is corrupted it doesn't spread to other sector. However, you lose access to entire drive/volume if VC boot loader/volume header was corrupted, this is when the above methods come into play. I've only once got this for around 5y use of TC/VC but the backup saved me.
     
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