.NET Core is Open Source

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by anon, Nov 13, 2014.

  1. anon

    anon Registered Member

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    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2014/11/12/net-core-is-open-source.aspx

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    Opening up Visual Studio and .NET to Every Developer, Any Application: .NET Server Core open source and cross platform, Visual Studio Community 2013 and preview of Visual Studio 2015 and .NET 2015
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/somasegar/a...eview-of-visual-studio-2015-and-net-2015.aspx
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    Microsoft open-sources .NET framework and offers Visual Studio Community 2013 for free
    http://thenextweb.com/microsoft/201...s-visual-studio-community-2013-free-everyone/
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2014
  2. Gullible Jones

    Gullible Jones Registered Member

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    Yay awesome! I hope this leads to more cross-platform applications, and .NET as a viable alternative to JVM.
     
  3. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    Now everyone can have what nobody wanted to start with!
     
  4. Pharao

    Pharao Registered Member

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    Exactly!
    An insecure environment that nobody asked for except for some lazy or less skilled programmers.
     
  5. Gullible Jones

    Gullible Jones Registered Member

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    I think you are mistaken.
    a) Programs using the .NET runtime are managed code, and are immune to the memory management issues that plague C/C++ programs, barring bugs in the runtime itself. Silverlight is a different matter, but who uses Silverlight?
    b) Right now Java and the JVM are hugely dominant in industry. JVM is fast, but it's also incredibly heavy on resources. Competition is good, and might provide impetus for Oracle to improve the JVM.

    Edit:
    c) Writing large applications in C/C++ is really freaking hard. Memory management is an absolute bear in something the size of e.g. a browser, which is why modern browsers have vulnerabilities galore and need things like Chrome's setuid/seccomp sandbox. OTOH, Python/Ruby/etc. are too slow for a lot of things (especially on servers). Runtime environments like JVM and .NET bridge that gap, allowing large applications to run at decent speed. AFAIK the only other competitors to JVM are projects like Parrot and LuaJIT that barely anyone's heard of... So yeah, having most of .NET as open source is a good thing IMO.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2014
  6. Night_Raven

    Night_Raven Registered Member

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    Agreed. But hating on Microsoft was always (and still is) considered cool.
     
  7. Pharao

    Pharao Registered Member

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    An unsecure environment is an extra risk for the user, no matter if it was shipped by Oracle or Microsoft.

    Praising such cross-platform environments because they cut costs is like **potentially offensive phrase removed**
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2014
  8. Gullible Jones

    Gullible Jones Registered Member

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    @Pharao
    a) Implementation flaws != design flaws
    b) Cross-platform runtimes are an absolute vital necessity in this age
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2014
  9. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    Hating Microsoft is not my motivation, but I do hate .NET.
     
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