Need a graphics card recommendation for SFF PC

Discussion in 'hardware' started by zopzop, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. zopzop

    zopzop Registered Member

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  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    You need to state your budget and the intended purpose of this computer before we can offer any real suggestions. That is a PCIe x 16 slot.

    I have to say, I wonder about that Lite-on power supply, however. I believe it could be counterfeit. The big red flag for me is the 80 PLUS Platinum logo. As seen here, Lite-on does make 1 240W supply that earned the prestigious Platinum certification, but the model numbers don't match with anything on your image. I believe the Lite-on model number is that shown in the upper right of your image, PS-4241-1HC, but none of the results for that with Google indicate Platinum - and that would be something to brag about. And searching the HP model numbers does not show any Platinum supplies either.

    So, do you know for a fact this supply came from an authorized HP distributor?
     
  3. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    I have a Lenovo ThinkCentre with similar specifications. I think the integrated Intel 4600 system is good enough for normal work, even for some games [I don´t play games].

    Given the PSU limitations [240 W] and the fact the the available slot is low profile, there are some graphic card you could add, but I wouldn´t expect a noticeable difference in performance.

    According with some Lenovo docs, two compatible cards are: NVIDIA Geforce GT 620 [30 W], AMD Radeon HD 8470 [25 W]. The card power usage should be 40 W max.

    I think it´s more important to add memory to the system to improve its performance, if it has 4 GB or less. The integrated Intel graphics can use up to 1.7 GB of main memory.
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I agree that adding more RAM would most likely add more bang for the money - BUT that depends on how much is currently installed. So knowing that (and all system specs) would be good to know. And of course, if running 32-bit Windows, 4GB is most the system will support anyway.
     
  5. zopzop

    zopzop Registered Member

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    @Robin A. and Bill_Bright
    It's an i3 4330 with 8gbs of RAM and a 500gb HDD running windows 10.

    What's the best video card I can squeeze in there without upgrading the PSU?

    What about the GT 730 1GB DDR5 video card? It says the max TDP is 38W?
    https://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/1988/geforce-gt-730.html
     
  6. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    That card seems good, not clear to me if it´s low profile [assuming you need a low profile card].

    When I posted before I was thinking of i5 processors. Graphics can be different in an i3.
     
  7. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    You can't do much with that PSU. A Corsair CX430 V2 is a darn good start investment and costs less than 100 bucks. With that, you can pretty much stuff a GTX970 plus a Core i7 4790K with an OC to 4.4 GHz and the PSU could still hold them with spair electricity to sell to your neighbours.
     
  8. Victek

    Victek Registered Member

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    I have the GT 730 in my new Dell and performance is just fine in Windows 10, but I'm not a gamer, are you? If you play games like first person shooters you can't have too much performance, and cards that don't require a separate power line are probably not going to cut it. A 500 watt replacement PSU can be had for <$50 and installing it is a piece of cake (or walk in the park).
     
  9. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    Just remember: buy PSU's from known and good companies. Those horrible Leadership "gamer" and other bad quality PSU's ***NEVER*** deliver what they advertise. There are tests showing these craps delivering 250W when they advertise 750W, not to mention the electrical fluctuation and noise they output, which will ruin your equipment over time.
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Sadly, Corsair has not maintained the quality they built their reputation on with all of their PSUs. In several models, they have changed OEM suppliers and now use cheaper components within. :( The CX series is next to the bottom in Corsair PSUs and recent models have not done well in professional reviews or reliability. I no longer recommend Corsair PSUs unless they are in the RM, Hxi or AXi series - most of which are still top-tier quality. I prefer Seasonic, XFX, EVGA and some Antecs.
    This is very true and is exactly why I recommend getting no less than 80 PLUS "Gold" supplies from reliable makers. But regardless, you should still do your homework and research the professional review sites to see what they say.

    Do NOT put much faith in "user reviews" because (1) they are not professional, and (2) they often down-grade a product because FedEx crushed the box, or UPS delivered next door or Amazon shipped the wrong color. I only consider user reviews if there are many reporting the exact same problem with the exact same product.
     
  11. zopzop

    zopzop Registered Member

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    It's low profile. Will the PSU be able to handle the GT 730 I linked to?

    It's a pre teens PC. Meaning it's all Lego stuff and Minecraft. I just need the 'best' card that will fit in that PC without upgrading the PSU (which I don't want to do as it's an extra expense).
     
  12. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    The good thing is that even with the CX series, they're pretty good. You can see in this very-uber-professional test that the older CX 430 (V1) delivered almost 550W (!) and it was approved in every aspect there is (current stability, electrical noise, etc). Anyway, as I said, it's a good -START- :p
     
  13. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    It requiers a 300 W minimum power supply,
    EVGA GeForce GT 730 2GB GDDR5 64bit DVI/HDMI/VGA Low Profile Graphics Card 02G-P3-3733-KR.

    I don´t know if the TDP specification implies that the maximum power drawn is 38 W, or if this refers to the maximum amount of heat generated by the card.
     
  14. zopzop

    zopzop Registered Member

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  15. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    The problem is that different implementations have different specs. Another example:
    MSI GeForce GT 730 DirectX 12 N730K-1GD5LP/OC 1GB 64-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Low Profile Video Card

    In this case:
    Power consumption: 49W
    Recommended Power Supply: 300W

    Also check if you want a single-slot or a double-slot card. The above is "single slot" but in the pictures I see it as "double slot".
     
  16. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    Well, my previous post came out wrong and I can't edit it. We'll see how this one is formatted.

    @Robin A.

    See "10 reasons why GPU manufactureres ask for a ridiculous PSU power" http://forum.clubedohardware.com.br/topic/968149-10-razões-para-o-fabricante-da-placa-de-vídeo-pedir-fonte-de-exagerada-potência/

    If he adds the GT730 to his machine, everything will consume at most 200W (at peak consumption). Obviously there is no modern PSU that develivers just that, but if he wants there are a few old Seventeam PSU's that are 350W. But... there is no advantage on buying them, we're not in the 90's anymore, he might want to buy a better GPU next month and notice his PSU can't hadle it. A good and modern 500W PSU will hold any modern 1-GPU "Gamer PC", so it's a good investment on the long run.

    Anyway, the point is: don't trust the manufacturer when it comes to PSU power. Sometimes they'll recommend 1000W when you only need 450W.

    Also, don't trust the Outervision's recommended PSU wattage. Their calculator is VERY good, but they'll always recommend 50W more, which is just dumb. If you want to make a good PSU dimensioning, do something like 20 or 30 % more (wattage x .7 --- or wattage x .8) on top of their "Load Wattage"
     
  17. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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  18. roady

    roady Registered Member

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  19. zopzop

    zopzop Registered Member

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    I think the DD5 version, which I wound up purchasing, has significantly higher memory bandwidth than the 730 DDR3 version or the HD 4600.

    It arrived today, I installed it. Messed around the internet for about an hour watching 1080p videos and so far so good. I'll really put it to the test tomorrow by testing a game or two. So far it seems like the PSU is holding up.

    UPDATE :
    Played Star Wars : The Old Republic MMO on very high settings at 1440*900 for an hour straight and everything worked just fine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2016
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