Mullvad leaking?

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by oblue, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. oblue

    oblue Registered Member

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    Hey guys,

    Just would like to let you know about my experience with Mullvad. I've been using their service for a week or so. Connection is fast and simple, speed is OK. Few days ago I connected to Amsterdam and did an ip leak test. The first test was done on ipleak.com and second one on iplocation.net. Ipleak.com showed the name of Netherlands on the right side of the page and the name "Sweden" on the right side of the page right under "Interactive detection".

    The second test done with iplocation.net also showed that one of my locations was Sweden and the organisation's name was "Mullvad". I sent an email to Mullvad regarding the matter and they told me that that was due to wrong geo location on some of the servers and they contacted their providers about the matter. Well, that was quite a disappointment. Any thoughts?
     

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  2. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    It's the same IP address in both cases so it seems that's indeed a problem with geo-location and not an IP leak. If you check 3rd pick you'll see that the same address is once shown as in Netherlands and then also in Sweden.
     
  3. oblue

    oblue Registered Member

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    I don't know much about the technical details but don't you think that my reason behind using a VPN is compromised if the name of Mullvad is visible to the website I'm connecting to?
     
  4. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I guess that most internet facing IP addresses used by VPN providers are known so you can't hide you are using a VPN service. That's not really what VPN tries to hide. They just try to hide your real IP address.
     
  5. oblue

    oblue Registered Member

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    You may be right because I've been blocked by a few websites saying too many connections from the IP address I'm using.

    Uhm, I'm not too sure about this, some VPN providers employ technologies to bypass DPI, so no gov agencies, ISPs or even companies like Netflix may know that you're using VPN. Now my question is, if what you have said about IP addresses is true, then how come some providers can manage to fool such companies as Netflix which should be the number one company to have most, if not all, of those IP numbers in their block list?

    Besides, I've never had such issues with Proton VPN.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2020
  6. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    It's trivial to determine the exit IP addresses of VPN services. Because anyone can lease an account. So you just write a script that connects to each VPN server, and uses ipchicken.com or whatever to get the IP address. Or you buy the lists from someone who did that.

    Just for kicks, I did that for VPN services that were using apparently residential proxies to evade geoblocking. I was curious about the source(s) of those proxies.
     
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