Mirror update delusions

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 2 Forum' started by nok, Mar 13, 2006.

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  1. nok

    nok Registered Member

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    I wish there was a step by step guide to how should I update my client machines. Is the only interaction between server and clients through the mirror update? The clients are updating automatically so why do i use the mirror update?

    And if I use the mirror update is this how I do it.

    Create mirror folder on c drive on server.
    Share it
    create mirror drive on client by linking to share on server.

    When I do this I get error creating file.

    So there are two questions: why use the mirror folder service is the client is updating anyway, and how to set up the mirror on server and client.

    thx
     
  2. anotherjack

    anotherjack Registered Member

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    Back when I first tried NOD, I attempted to use the file share method for the mirror files. Never got it to work, so I changed to the http: mirroring method and have never had any problems. It's worked flawlessly from the first day. Check the admin documentation for the specifics and let us know if you need additional help.

    As to why use the mirroring, if you have a large number of machines it makes it much easier to manage both network traffic and licenses. For instance - I have approximately 3400 or so machines on my network. I update a single server with my license information, and by using the mirroring function, all of my machines are updated, since they go to internal servers to update. I don't have all of them going to Eset for updates, etc., adding additional traffic to the network.

    Jack
     
  3. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    For creating a share....on the RAS, you create your directory, making sure NTFS permissions are correct, say D:\NOD32\Mirror....
    Then share out that mirror directory, so that the UNC path for clients would be something like \\servername\mirror
    Create an account for the clients to log in and have read access rights to that share, on the few UNC updating setups I've done, I just created an account like Eset/nod32 and then build that into the config for your clients...so that they can authenticate to the share for updates.

    BUT...the http method is much more effecient, and client authentication is needed. On your RAS, in the mirror section, just specify "Enable http"...and you do not need a username and a password for your clients. The default port is fine unless you have something else running on that port on that server, such as Sharepoint (SBS servers be aware). Then, you simply set your config for clients to get their updates from http:\\192.168.1.11:8081 (substitute your servers actual IP address)

    The idea of having all clients get their updates from the server....
    1) Less of a hit on your internet pipe. Granted NOD32 does small updates, but on larger networks...imagine dozens or hundreds of workstations all pulling updates within a small amount of time from your internet pipe..that's quite a hit. Having 1x machine (your RAS) pull those updates...the quickly distribute it across your nice fast LAN...is more efficient.
    2) Plus...say some outbreak occurs, you can quickly update your RAS...and update clients...all within minutes from one console.
     
  4. nok

    nok Registered Member

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    i got hold of a Brazilian video tutortial which sorted out a lot of my questions.

    In the "Notifications" under system setup, it asks for a server address. I'm using a pop3 connector to retrieve mail from my ISP account. I used the mail.domain.com and did not receive a test msg. I also used Http://servername without success.

    What is the server address then? Or is this only for Exchange using a static ip and mx record etc?
     
  5. webyourbusiness

    webyourbusiness Registered Member

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    Use the static IP of the server - example:

    http://10.0.0.23:8081

    or, the name if your have issued the machine a name.
     
  6. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    Sounds like some DNS issues. You need proper name resolution across your network for certain apps to function correctly.
     
  7. alglove

    alglove Registered Member

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    Be sure you put the port number (8081 by default) after the server name. For example, http://servername:8081 . Otherwise, it assumes the standard port for HTTP, which is port 80, and it tries to access a regular website on your server.
     
  8. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    He appears to be talking about http://servername in regards to notifications....I don't believe that runs on port 8081. That's something you want the name of your SMTP box in.
     
  9. anotherjack

    anotherjack Registered Member

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    You should be putting the name of your SMTP server in there. That should solve it. Normally a mail.domain.com server is used for retrieving web based mail, not sending it, though YMMV. My ISP, for instance, uses SMTP.domain.com for sending, and pop.domain.com for receiving my pop3 email. The mail.domain.com server is used only for webmail. Check with your service provider to see what's to be used.

    Jack
     
  10. alglove

    alglove Registered Member

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    Oh, duh. You are right. I missed the part about "Notifications". :blink:

    Can he use his Exchange server as his SMTP server? You are better versed in Exchange/SBS than I am, YeOldeStoneCat.
     
  11. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    :thumb: Usually when SBS Exchange is used with the POP connector, as it appears he's doing..the wizard sets up a virtual SMTP server which you usually have forward to your ISPs DNS server. But I'd assume he wants his notifications to stay within the organization...forwarding perhaps to his own mailbox..so having it sent to his Exch box so it goes to his e-mail addy should be fine, instead of going out to the ISPs DNS servers then back in through POP mail...with that 15 minute interval of the POP connector.
     
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