Migrating from Ubuntu to Debian

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by cet, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    I have been using Linux since I was 45 now I am 53.I am a housewife and an electronic engineer(never worked) I learned linux from scratch by reading from the internet.I was a dedicated Ubuntu(unity) user for years(Only system on home PC), last month I got bored and tried Ubuntu Gnome which I loved.After trying all the live CD's from different distros such as Suse ,Solydx, Centos etc I decided to install Debian as the only system on the desktop PC at home.I tried the live Gnome Debian and it is working great.Installed skype etc all are working.I fall in love with the Debian Gnome.It is simple elegant and easy to use for everyday use.I only play 1 game on facebook(needs flash) so I will only install Google Chrome repository.
    I have a few questions:1.During the installation debian asks for root user and another user.I would like to use it the way I used with Ubuntu.So if I leave the root user password blank and create password for the username will I be able to use sudo apt-get.... as I did in Ubuntu? (I am the only user of this home PC)
    2.I am going to install the stable version.But Iceweasel version is at 38.5 So should I add backports to update Iceweasel or use as it is?
    3.Using stable version and adding backports seems to me better than using unstable,what do you think?
     
  2. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    1. https://wiki.debian.org/sudo has instructions on how to enable sudo.
    2. FYI http://mozilla.debian.net - gives you instructions of how to add newer versions. I would personally stick with ESR versions.
    3. Subjectively better. It would be my preference, but I did find back ports was not that useful for the apps I was interested in having newer versions of packages.
     
  3. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    Yup.

    That depends. Do you need an Iceweasel feature that is not present version 38?

    Backports should be used with caution because they're not well tested. Using backports could very well break your entire system, depending on what you use from backports.

    Remember: Debian Stable has a reputation of being stable, because they don't change it.
    However, you could install Debian Unstable and also install the package "apt-listbugs" which will warn you if there are any reported bugs for the package you want to install. But remember: just because there are filed bugs doesn't mean you shouldn't install the package, usually the bugs are non-critical. So if there are any bugs file, go check on the bug #number to see if they're critical or not.

    From the Wiki page of Backports:
    Code:
    Backports cannot be tested as extensively as Debian stable, and backports are provided on an as-is basis, with risk of incompatibilities with other components in Debian stable. Use with care!
    
    It is therefore recommended to only select single backported packages that fit your needs, and not use all available backports.
     
  4. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    Thank you for the answers,so I am not going to enable the backports.Iceweasel 38 is more than enough for me.
    Yup. Does this mean Yes for the first question amarildojr
     
  5. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    I use irregularly Linux as second OS since 2004, but I remain a common user, I tried Mandriva ( 2004 ), Ubuntu, Mint, I saw fedora. I don't see many differences. I wish to know: which are the reason to switch to Debian - or to Centos, for example, or to... - for a common Linux user ?
     
  6. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    The first reason is that The PC is 3 years old not a new PC.Second I do not like the latest versions but prefer stability.I love the gnome interface.5 years of support is good because I do not like to install every 2 years 6 months etc.Ubuntu is my first linux system,I played with it a lot I learned linux (a little) by using Ubuntu,tried many different themes and icons.Tried linux mint but it is not just for me.But now I feel like doing a spring cleaning and want a clean working system with 5 yrs of support.Also debian is ''independent'' and the origin is ''Global''that is important for me.
     
  7. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    This thread has a familiar ring to it. I started with Ubuntu as well but when I wanted more stability I also went to Debian. I bet as the two of us develop our Linux prowess we might even go to more hard core (not newbie friendly) stuff down the road. Debian has performed flawlessly as a host OS and as a family computer. I even run it in a few VM's with TOR on them and it sails along never missing a beat.

    I am amazingly happy with Debian. However; Ubuntu most definitely has a place and they are cutting edge with updates multiple times a day sometimes.

    The tradeoff was an easy one for me. Stability ------ beats ------ cutting edge with associated growing pains. Updates daily was a pain.
     
  8. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    Correct.

    For an advanced user, there are many. For a common user, there could be stability; better privacy; but a more difficult to install system.
     
  9. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    @ cet and amarildojr: thank you for the answers.
     
  10. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    You are welcome
     
  11. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    I wanted to jump on this too. For me the Debian installer is very powerful. I was able to personally configure my LVM's and even the parameters of the encryption header for LUKS to my specifications. Small learning curve compared to Ubuntu for the install, but the end product is something you'll be happy with if you put the time in to organize it.
     
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