Met Police to extract suspects' mobile phone data

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Dermot7, May 17, 2012.

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  1. Dermot7

    Dermot7 Registered Member

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18102793

    + http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/may/17/met-software-mobile-phones
    http://www.radio-tactics.com/news/t...mobile-phone-data-extraction-capability/290/1
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  2. Dermot7

    Dermot7 Registered Member

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  3. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    In other news, owner's of WhisperCore'd Nexus S' were heard laughing loudly at today's announcement. :D

    PD
     
  4. JackReacher

    JackReacher Registered Member

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    Should WhisperCore users be laughing seeing as WhisperCore was bought by Twitter, a corporation whose business model is based around harvesting its users personal data?

    This is a genuine question, does this change in ownership jeopardize Whispercore's mission of protecting user data? Or will WhisperCore's products continue to protect your personal data, even from themselves?

    In regards to the article, It seems every time I open up a paper the UK has taken yet another civil liberty away from its citizens.
     
  5. roady

    roady Registered Member

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    They are the only ones......as WhisperCore is ,AFAIK,the only Android app that supports FULL disc encryption,and it's still not ported to other devices.....wonder wat will happen in the near future now that Twitter bought it a while ago......Ice cream Sandwich has buid-in encryption,but I bet that this 1 is easy to circumvent for Law Enforcement agencies....:( :thumbd:
     
  6. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    In the UK, refusal to provide encryption keys is itself a crime (worth two years, if memory serves).
     
  7. hashed

    hashed Registered Member

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    One reason (among many) I will never visit the UK; not that the US is too far behind with their draconian measures.
     
  8. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Yeah and it is my understanding the Cops don't even need a warrant. They can just walk up to you on the street at random and say "give me those crypto keys or go to jail."
     
  9. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    I agree with you guy's about WC/Twitter...v0.5.5 was the last 'independent' version before the buy out. But It still works, as does Gingerbread 2.3.5, and always should. I'm not a 'phone guy', so I can't see wanting to upgrade for a long, long time. I've still got the installer, and a phone image. They *did* open source TextSecure, so who knows...but yeah, I don't trust Twitter either, and don't use it.

    Also, good call on UK law...forgot about that and was being US centric. Glad I don't live there.

    ICS encryption bases it's key on the screen unlock code IIRC. On 2.3.5 there is a max of 16 characters, I don't know about ICS, or how thoroughly it's been studied.

    Cellebrite puts out PR announcements about being able to bypass this and that, for certain models...but I don't know if that's for ICS encrypted phones, or just marketing hype...which companies are known to do, ie.

    "XYZ Company is proud to announce TrueCrypt Decryption!...as long as the computer is up and running and you can dump the memory...we can't do anything with a shut down computer or an unmounted container.

    PD
     
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