Malicious Use of VPN ISP: How Often a Problem??

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by chinook9, Jun 18, 2012.

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  1. chinook9

    chinook9 Registered Member

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    Today I am using a trial subscription to a VPN. I have already had two problems with the selected ISP being untrusted.

    First, I was on a server in Arizona and PayPal would not let me into my account, until I had answered verification questions, because the ISP was suspicious. I changed to a server in Chicago and the same thing happened again.

    Secondly, still on the Chicago server, I entered a search in Google but Google required a confirmation that I was human before the the search was completed.

    Is this often a problem with or VPNs? Is this more often a problem with VPNs that liberal trial programs?
     
  2. box750

    box750 Registered Member

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    Paypal will block your account if they see you are using an IP from abroad, specially one marked as a VPN service. The same goes for most billing companies, VPNs are often used for fraud, they will block your account or transaction if you log in using a VPN.

    Edit: I forgot to mention that you don't have to use Google to search the Internet, use Startpage.com and the confirmation problem will go away.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2012
  3. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    Googles sees too many queries from the same IP (VPN's server IP) in a short time interval and it suspects something is wrong. That's why it will require a confirmation. Same thing happens on some TOR exit nodes.
     
  4. chinook9

    chinook9 Registered Member

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    Anyone know if the problems I had are as bad with paid VPNs as with free ones?
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    That happens occasionally with some paid VPNs, and very frequently for some exit servers.
     
  6. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    This is the difference between the need for a VPN for privacy/pseudo-anonymity and a VPN for safety using public wifi.

    What you really want for your purposes is a VPN that will provide a dedicated IP that hasn't been blacklisted and is out of the IP range of their shared IPs. It can be very handy to not have to worry in public about using your laptop for Amazon, PayPal, banking, etc. A VPN with a dedicated IP is basically the same as your home IP. You could even always use it and be wrapped in security all the time. The idea here is not to hide yourself - in fact, to the contrary.
     
  7. chinook9

    chinook9 Registered Member

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    Than you for clarifying the situation for me. I believe the VPNs that will provide a private IP are probably most costly than I want to pay.

    I have switched to another VPN (BoxPN) temporarily to see if I have the same problems. So far I haven't but I have only used it a couple of days.

    Thanks again!
     
  8. BryanW

    BryanW Registered Member

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    Using paid StrongVPN service with a dynamic IP through a California server has always been "trusted". They are a paid service and do not offer any free trials. From my experience, there would be no advantage changing to a static IP.
     
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