Macromedia Player

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Juliet, Jan 31, 2007.

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  1. Juliet

    Juliet Registered Member

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    Recently used Microsoft Secunia Software Inspector and received details about a program on my PC which I have been unable to locate and told that they should be updated.
    It suggests that I should uninstall and update to a later version. Of course being unable to locate program in question I am unable to uninstall.
    Can anyone suggest a reason why it is not possible to find prog in question.

    The prog in question is Macromedia Flash Player v7.0.19.0 and I have been told that update version is 9.0.28.0

    Thanks for help / solution if possible.
     
  2. Bob D

    Bob D Registered Member

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    When running the Secunia Inpector, try opening up the "+" by the flagged Flash warning.
    This should show you the path to the offending outdated proggie.
    I suspect it may be inside another app.
    Also, you may search your harddrive for "flash".
     
  3. ThunderZ

    ThunderZ Registered Member

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    It can conceivably show up in several different places as it will install plug-ins depending on what Browser(s) you have installed. When you run the Secunia scan there is an option to have in check in non-standard places, or something to that affect. This will show all areas that have the at risk software installed. Then you can go HERE for removal instructions prior to installing the new version.
     
  4. Juliet

    Juliet Registered Member

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    Hi Guys

    Thanks for your Advice / Help
    Update on current situation as follows:
    I have tried to follow yr instructions to best of my ability which is limited and in the process did a search in Add/Remove and found that Adobe Flash Player 9 Active x is installed.
    No mention within Add/Remove refers to Macromed Flash Player 7.0.19.0 which Secunia indicated was installed on my PC.
    Can I assume that the name Adobe has replaced Macromedia because in the section of Secunia, Adobe Flash Player 9.0.28.0 is ticked in green whereas Macromedia Flash Player 7.0.19.0 is ticked in red with the notation as being insecure.

    Reading the article how to uninstall Flash Player there was mention about going into the registry which as an beginner very reluctant to perform.

    Having said that the question is, the fact that Adobe Flash Player 9.0.28.0 is mentioned as being installed should I bother about Macromedia 7.0.19.0 o_O

    Awaiting further instructions.
     
  5. Bob D

    Bob D Registered Member

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    Adobe Macromedia Flash Player's name has been truncated to just "Adobe Flash Player".
    Per my and ThunderZ's previous comments, vestiges of earlier releases may be embedded in numerous proggies.
    What you need to do first is identify the location of these offending outdated releases.
    Run again the Secunia Inpector, try opening up the "+" by the flagged Flash warning.
    This should show you the path to the offending outdated proggie.

    Cheers
     
  6. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    i had same problem a few weeks ago.
    just use the flash removal tools and then install the lastest flash 9
    lodore
     
  7. nei1

    nei1 Registered Member

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    I love those doggies...

    Now, on to business. A different take:

    Just because a utility tells you to update a program doesn't mean you have to. There's a school of thought that says that if you keep updating your software, you're computer hardware will become obsolete. If the software is working well for you, there might be no good reason to update it.

    One good reason to update is documented security problems with the older version. I know the Adobe Flash-download webpage says the latest version is more secure, but I would get more unbiased opinions on Wildersecurity.com before taking Adobe's word for it.

    For instance, if there really is a serious security issue, but if you're running SpyBlocker in the background, is there any real reason to update an old version of Flash?

    In many ways, Flash is a pest. It slows down the loading of webpages; it's a favorite of webvertisements that "flash" and distract you from the desired content; if you're easily distracted, you're bound to click on a flash-ad and download some spyware; if you right-click on flash content (such as flash-video), you'll find that you're not given the option to do a darned thing with it -- for instance, no Full Screen, and no Properties (which would help to identify the provider of the "advertisement" just in case you wanted to block further content from them).

    Content wise, if you don't update Flash, you're not missing much.

    Well, there's some good Flash out there. Try going to dailymotion.com and search for "Beatles." It's a video-serving website, and much to my dismay, it's all Flash.

    So what I do, instead of uninstalling and reinstalling Flash all the time, I leave it installed. Then, I also installed jTFlashManager from www.jtedley.com/jtflashmanager/index.php.

    jTFlashManager allows you to turn off the Flash, separately for each browser if you have more than one. At worst, when there's rare, desired Flash content, and the FlashManager has Flash turned off, there will be a little square on the webpage noodging you to "install" Flash. But in that case, all you'd have to do is switch your FlashManager "On" to get the Flash content to play, or perhaps reload the webpage also, or perhaps restart the browser also... Well, at least I never had to reboot the whole computer to get the Flash to start playing! It's a little clumsy activating and deactivating Flash content, but with a little perseverance, you can switch the Flash "On," and see desired Flash content, and switch it Off when it starts becoming annoying again. The author of the FlashManager says he will try to get an update whereby the On/Off switch will be more immediately effective.

    Usually, I have Flash turned off for Internet Explorer and Firefox browsers, and actually I rarely need to turn it On. My wife uses this computer too, and she doesn't even realize that Flash is missing. Her subconscious just realizes that browsing is more peaceful.

    Yes, Macromedia vs. Adobe. The discrepancy between the present, proper name and what your utility calls it is a “problem” of the updating utility. Your update-alerting utility probably needs to be updated o_O

    There are important things in this world to worry about. Don't lose sleep over Flash.

    I tried an updating utility. It told me that my webcam driver needs to be updated. Now, they wanted $25 for me to "join" the service so I could get all the updates I want. However, I know that this old, plastic camera has no updates for WinXP. I know it, and I know that I don't need to spend $25 so I can fight about how they didn't provide the service they said they would.

    In the process, I'm developing my own opinions about the new breed of "driver-update-alerting" utilities.

    Additionally, they need permission to probe all your hardware to do their job (such as they do). Seems ripe for a spyware version to be released, some day.

    A more pointed solution to possibly-dated drivers is to get familiar with the hardware in your computer, and check the manufacturers' websites for driver updates, yourself, one by one. Everyone needs a hobby. Fortunately, you love it.

    To find out what's in your computer, try a system-analysis program like Belarc (http://www.belarc.com/). It does a fair job of listing all the hardware you have (manufacturers and model #s), and a good job of listing all the software you've installed.

    If a piece of hardware isn't giving you a problem, there's no motivation for looking for a driver update.

    And the latest advice I've embraced is that if a piece of software (like Adobe Reader) has an auto-update function, turn it off. Obviously, that doesn't include your security software...

    I find it interesting that this question should arise regarding an Adobe product. Adobe Flash and Adobe Reader are the two last pieces of software I would be concerned about keeping updated.

    I don't know about you, but now I feel better.

    -Neil-


    Screaming 1.4 GHz Celeron, CA Antivirus, SpyBlocker, myNetWatchman, SpamCop Addict, Freaking Windows Defender (for all the good it does), ClimatePrediction.net
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2007
  8. RabidWolf

    RabidWolf Registered Member

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    Just had the same thing, having the latest version as well, but I found a Macromedia subdirectory/folder under Windows/Programs that had the offending ocx file. Since everything there was from 2004 or earlier, I deleted the entire folder. Now Secunia is happy.

    I'm not real keen on Flash, anyway, and since Adobe now owns it, even less so, so I haven't really tested it to see if the new Adobe version still works. Bet it does. :)

    Hope this helps!
     
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