looking for software which open each iexplorer with new MAC addreess

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by demoneye, Aug 1, 2009.

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  1. demoneye

    demoneye Registered Member

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    HI

    i am looking for software which can open each internet explorer or any other
    browser with fake MAC address , i mean each page differ MAC ....

    anyone got any lead to such utility ?

    cheers
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009
  2. Warlockz

    Warlockz Registered Member

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    No such software exists, you could get 3 laptops and install Technitium MAC Address Changer on each of them and constantly change your MAC Address........their really is no point to it though................unless your extremely paranoid......

    http://www.technitium.com/tmac/index.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
  3. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    The browser is not aware of your MAC address, so there is no such software. It is possible in theory to change MAC for every connection the computer makes to a server, but as there is no point in doing that, I doubt anyone created such a software.
     
  4. SundariDevi

    SundariDevi Registered Member

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    Hi,

    In theory there are two ways to do this, but I've never seen it work. Not that I tried very hard :)

    The first way is that some windows PC network cards allow the MAC address to be changed manually via windows properties for that hardware (this is spoofing, just changing the MAC address that is shown to the world). It's important to note that a MAC address is not randomly generated, so to create a "real" looking MAC address you'll need to do a bit of research and see which block of the MAC address corresponds to the manufacturer, and make sure that the number you choose is that of a real manufacturer (preferable the same as the one that made your hardware) and that other portions of the number also are valid for real MAC addresses. But that won't get you too far because, while you can change the MAC address, the address range that can be manually generated contains a prefix (or suffix?) that always identifies itself as such. You can not manually change to an OEM generated (original) MAC address. As a result, you will not be able to hijack a wifi connection, for example, by copying somebody else's MAC address in an internet cafe, unless that person has already manually changed their MAC address (if they have then you could do this)

    There are some software utilities that do this for you. Just google MAC Address change or something like that, there are several.

    The browser is not aware of the MAC address because it is only used at the network level. For example, when you go into an internet cafe, the only way a router knows what information to send to your computer, is because every request to send or receive information contains your MAC address. For this reason it can become an important security feature.

    Some routers are able to log MAC addresses so it is possible to uniquely identify a machine that accessed a certain website or sent a certain email by associating the IP address (from the router) with the machine that generated that request to the router at the same time. Routers can also generate MAC address block lists, so that certain machines cannot access the network.

    If you are in a country ruled by an oppressive regime and want to anonymously send messages from a web cafe you might be interested in masking your MAC address as a last ditch security measure because in principle the MAC address can uniquely identify a machine (like a serial number). And the MAC address along with a router log could prove that this machine sent certain emails or accessed certain websites.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2009
  5. Keyboard_Commando

    Keyboard_Commando Registered Member

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  6. SteveTX

    SteveTX Registered Member

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  7. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    I've changed my network card MAC address thousands of times. There are generally two reasons for me to do this.

    1. If I'm connecting to a wireless network that isn't my own and I don't want to be identified.

    2. To change the IP address that my ISP provides. Some ISPs will give you a new IP every time you change your MAC.

    From my experience, anything starting with "0000" will work. You can probably change the other characters to anything.

    You can only have one MAC address for a network card, so you can't change the MAC for every instance of IE. You will probably have to disable then re-enable your network card after you change your MAC. And, even then, it may take a few minutes to regain your internet connection.

    If you're changing your MAC to connect to your own ISP, watch out for them turning off your internet connection after a period of time.
     
  8. StevieO

    StevieO Registered Member

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    Don't know what you're doing, but it sounds intriguing :D
     
  9. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    A little of this. A little of that. Definitely not hacking into your e-mail. That's for sure. ;)
     
  10. SundariDevi

    SundariDevi Registered Member

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    Re: the above post which I repost here since it is an orphan thread:
    I guess in principal this is true, but somewhat misleading. If you are connecting from home (your "local network"), your ISP can see your MAC address if their system is configured to do so. The same would hold true for some hotspot network like Starbuck's. So while the the IP cannot be openly detected, somebody hacking into a system, or with some "official" access can potentially have access to your MAC address. Some ISPs (maybe not in the USA, but elsewhere for sure) use it to positively confirm that the machine connecting to the internet is that of the subscriber. Such networks require you to register a machine by entering it's MAC adress into their system before you can use it to go on the net.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
  11. demoneye

    demoneye Registered Member

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    10x a lot for all the reply , its sound no such software is exist :(
    i am sure there is a way or software that act like a MAC DHCP server , and can give each open browser different MAC address :)
     
  12. culla

    culla Registered Member

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  13. demoneye

    demoneye Registered Member

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  14. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    Since we've already established that it's either not possible or no one knows how to do it, perhaps you should tell us what you want to use it for. Then someone might be able to give you other suggestions.


    It's not a privacy risk at all with your own ISP. They know so much more about you than your MAC address that having that piece of information does not compromise privacy or anonymity at all. Why worry about a MAC address when they have your address, phone number, SSN, and every website you've ever visited? Steve is correct that the MAC address goes no further than the ISP. And only the MAC address of the device closest to the modem can even reach the ISP (usually). So, a laptop connecting to a router is not seen by the ISP, only the router's MAC (and possibly not even that). Some ISPs may only see the modem's MAC, and nothing else.

    It's only a privacy risk on a wireless network that you don't own.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
  15. SundariDevi

    SundariDevi Registered Member

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    Steve said it's only visible on your local network, which would lead most to believe that it doesn't leave the building and implied that MAC address security risks are folklore. Now you've mentioned two cases where it's not true. Where privacy and security are concerned it's best not to assume anything, especially when you don't know what the application will be.

    With respect to your own ISP, they do know all sorts of things. And if you have a wi-fi connection you can say. "It wasn't me, somebody hijacked my wi-fi address". But with the MAC address they can positively identify the machine that was used.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2009
  16. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    They can identify the machine if you don't have a router. But if you do have a router, the router can clone the MAC address of the computer. This fact alone implies that it's the device attached to the modem whose MAC address the ISP is interested in. I can verify that with my ISP when this MAC address is changed I get a new IP. I suppose I can't say with certainty that they can't obtain every MAC address of every device. Perhaps Steve can clarify which MAC addresses an ISP can obtain.

    Even if you don't have a router and they can positively identify the machine, it doesn't necessarily imply the owner was the user. The computer itself could have been hijacked.

    I suppose you are right that it is somewhat of a privacy risk if you have no idea how things work and you're looking for some plausible deniability about who originated the traffic. My understanding is that the ISP cannot obtain the MAC address of a wireless device connected to a router. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

    My take on what Steve said is that he's talking about the websites you visit not being able to obtain your MAC address, not your ISP. The post was entirely speculative though (as are all of these posts) because we have no idea what the OP wants to do.
     
  17. SundariDevi

    SundariDevi Registered Member

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    We're a little bit off topic now. I just wanted to point out that a MAC address is important in many cases, as some people were saying don't worry about it. With respect to ISPs, every ISP does what it wants. There is no generic setup.

    We can imagine two interesting cases. First is that you are a Cable ISP, when somebody signs up for your service, you give them/sell them a modem (even if you have one lying around, it probably won't work for the cable provider in your new city because the new ISP has a different setup). The ISP got the modem that they gave you from Motorola or something like that. They told the Motorola sales guy, we want to buy 100,000 units over the next year or two and we need a few software modifications. The Motorola guy does a quick calculation and figures $1MM sale and says, sure no problem. Now you have a modem that does whatever the ISP wants it to do including potentially sending MAC addresses to the ISP, logging them, remote log retrieval, whatever. We can further imagine that the ISP is in Iran or China and start to speculate as to what they might want.

    Secondly, I've been to cities in Europe where many wifi equipped cafes are all part of a network of many cafes in that city. To login you have to get a password from the waiter and log into a website where you type in the password. This is similar to a Starbuck's type setup or McDonald's in some cities. What they all have in common is a centrally administered wifi network. In one case when I logged in my MAC address appeared on the website saying I was logged in from a certain IP. So at least in some cases your MAC address is sent out to an internet server (you could say that in this case it is roughly analogous to your ISP). It's also easy to imagine that in some countries government/law enforcement officials would want access to this information because they know most standard users think a public access internet point makes them anonymous.

    You may be right concerning a router on your home network blocking the ISP from seeing your computer's MAC address. I don't know. In most cases when I change ISPs it's a lot of work to get a router that's not theirs set up. The point being that there are so many different variables in the router configuration. I've never gone through them asking myself whether a certain configuration would allow an ISP to get more information than another.

    Just adding something in here now as an EDIT, after being curious on a couple of issues:
    This thread has the same discussion with many of the same questions and comments:
    http://forums.cabling-design.com/wi...-automatic-randomizer-freeware-for-59597-.htm

    If you google hot spot server documentation you'll find that MAC addresses are very central, especially in web based hotspot authentification, and a lot of discussions concerning hijacking of connections by spoofing. Many imply that you can change your MAC address to somebody's OEM MAC address, which contradicts some information that I have (and posted above).
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2009
  18. SundariDevi

    SundariDevi Registered Member

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    The MAC address is a hardware feature not software. I think Warlocz got it right. If you want to run two different Internet Explorer windows at the same time, each having a different MAC address, then you need to run Internet Explorer on two different computers.
     
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