Linux for beginners

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Krusty, Jul 2, 2016.

  1. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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    Linux has support for UEFI for a long time, many years. Maybe you didn't disabled Secure Boot? Distributions must be signed to boot when Secure Boot is enabled and most aren't signed.
     
  2. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Okay, I've had success this time. Installing updates now.

    One thing I will either get sick of (being an Admin account user of Windows) or get used to is having enter my password all the time.
     
  3. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Correct. I didn't disable Secure Boot, but have this time.
     
  4. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Alrighty, this time has worked and all is updated and happy, Firefox does seem faster on this machine now than when running Windows. All very good!

    Two questions though (still a lot to learn obviously):
    1. How do I remove old temp files, keeping the OS house cleaned
    2. How do I look after my SSD?
    Thanks again.
     
  5. vasa1

    vasa1 Registered Member

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    Mostly, you need to provide your password only when you're logging in or installing software.
     
  6. vasa1

    vasa1 Registered Member

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    Which temp files?
     
  7. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    I dunno... Doesn't Linux leave crud behind after installing updates or uninstalling stuff? Remember, Windows user here.
    Or checking certain settings etc. Probably not an issue for someone used to the OS but for someone who is digging in and trying to find his way around...
     
  8. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    In the updater, Synaptics or whatever. Should be an option to delete old files. And there's BleachBit (if used use carefully).
     
  9. vasa1

    vasa1 Registered Member

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    I'd stay away from BleachBit or make very, very sure to understand all the options involved.

    Altering settings mostly won't need elevated privileges for a beginner. But again, that depends on which settings.

    I'd stay with the defaults that your OS comes initially. You could always ask at the Mint forums before changing things.

    If you use `apt-get` to install packages, the respective .debs are found in /var/cache/apt/archives. You can use sudo apt-get clean to remove all these .debs or sudo apt-get autoclean to remove only those .debs for which you've previously removed the corresponding applications.
     
  10. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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  11. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    I was wondering more about Trim / Optimization like Windows runs on occasion.
     
  12. ChrisFerro3

    ChrisFerro3 Registered Member

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    Is it normal that when you install Linux to SSD drive that you don't have a grub menu? It appears I have to do a boot repair to fix it as it won't boot or show anything.
     
  13. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    So far, now that I've got Mate installed successfully, I'm really liking it.

    I couldn't get Enpass installed but I allowed FF to save the logins for this site and another forum. I won't be doing anything mission-critical on that machine anyway.
     
  14. SnowWalker

    SnowWalker Registered Member

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  15. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Thanks SnowWalker. Very helpful!
    That is good to know.
     
  16. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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    Yes, you can run Kubuntu from a live DVD to try it out. I did that off and on for several years and now it's installed on my next work computer.
     
  17. SnowWalker

    SnowWalker Registered Member

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  18. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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    When it comes to security website linked by SnowWalker has some basic information: https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/security. I would argue with some sentences, but it isn't bad.
    Some other tips for baseline security:
    0. Don't misconfigure your system, especially security-critical daemons (services)!
    1. Don't type commands from unknown persons/non-authoritative sources without understanding what they do.
    2. Disable OpenSSH or force key-based authentication (maybe it Mint it is disabled by default? I don't know).

    If you want to improve security above baseline:
    0. Use uBlock with antiphishing/antimalware list in your web browser to prevent phishing.
    1. You can use secure DNS by OpenDNS or Quad9 - they also blocklist some malicious domains. This isn't probably arguable from perfect-privacy standpoint of view, but it is good for security.
    2. Use Firejail or Mandatory access control (SELinux,AppArmor) to sandbox internet-facing programs.
     
  19. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Great, thanks guys. All very helpful.
    My ISP is the quickest DNS provider for me and they also block some malicious websites. Quad9 is routed through California for me because my ISP won't allow me to connect to their Aussie servers. 1.1.1.1 is almost as quick as my ISP but last time I tried them I was having odd connection issues resolved by using the default.

    OpenDNS, nar, I don't like their data collection.
     
  20. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask, but I notice with Firefox on Mint Mate that when I right click the address bar it doesn't automatically highlight the URL like it does in Windows, which means I need to manually highlight the URL if I want to post a link.

    Is it just me?
     
  21. SnowWalker

    SnowWalker Registered Member

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    No, it's not just you, though double-clicking does work for me. If there is a setting to get it to work with a single click the same way it did in Windows, I haven't found it.
     
  22. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Yes, double-clicking does work for me too. Thanks for the tip.
     
  23. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    I have been reading this page and it mentions removing old Kernels. Looks like I have quite a few redundant Kernels.

    Screenshot at 2018-06-05 09-47-16.png

    Am I using the latest / correct version? It would seem that newer ones are installed. I have plenty of free space on my drive so aren't worried about leaving them there, but I am keen to know if I'm using the best version.

    (Kudos to me for learning how to take screenshots :thumb:)
     
  24. SnowWalker

    SnowWalker Registered Member

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    From your screenshot (kudos :D), the only kernel I can see that you have installed is 4.13.0-43, the one that shows as active. What you're seeing is a list of available kernels that you can download and install. When installed it will say "Installed" (or "Active" if it's the one being used) in the same area that your active one shows "Active" now.

    The best kernel is whichever one works best with your computer. Older ones (such as from the 4.4 series) may work better with older computers, newer ones (4.15) with newer hardware. And it's best to try to stick with the latest ones in a series (the one you're using is the latest in the 4.13 series) because of updates and fixes, such as spectre and meltdown or whatever.

    When/if you try a new kernel, you probably want to keep at least the last one you were using installed, and know how to boot the older one from the grub menu if you run into a problem on the newer one. Unless you manually select a kernel at boot, the latest kernel will always be used.

    (It kind of scary that I'm kind of sounding like an expert when I'm so new to Linux myself, so you have any concerns you may want to get a second opinion. :eek:)
     
  25. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    Thanks again, @SnowWalker . Much appreciated. No trouble so far so I'll leave things alone.
     
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