lesson learned the hard way (almost)

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by dwalby, Apr 9, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dwalby

    dwalby Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Posts:
    174
    Location:
    SoCal
    I always do restores without bothering to validate the archive first, as I never seemed to have any problems with archive files or the restore process itself. But then a few months ago I had a corrupt archive, which was no big deal, I just used the one from the week before instead.

    Yesterday I had a new problem that could have ended very badly, but fortunately worked out OK just by luck. Upon doing a restore of my C: partition the hard drive that contains all my image files started to have problems. Part way through the restore I got the dreaded "can't read from sector X" error. So now my original C: partition had been deleted, and partially restored, so I assume it was gone forever, since I now had unallocated space where it used to be. If the restore hadn't started at all I suspect I could have undone the partition delete operation, but since it had progressed about 25% through the restore I think it had already overwritten a lot of sectors before terminating due to the disk error.

    So now I had no C: partition, and the drive with all my backups was having read problems so I wasn't sure I could successfully restore any of them. Fortunately, the second image file I tried restored OK. I also had an old disk from 18 months ago with XP on it that I could have swapped in as a last resort, but wasn't looking forward to doing 18 months of Windows updates.

    So this time I was lucky, but from now on I think I'm going to spend the extra few minutes validating the archive before actually going forward with the restore process.
     
  2. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751
    Your situation underscores two things, apart from the validation issue.

    1. Keep more than one backup of your system. Something can go wrong with stored data for a number of reasons. Disk storage is cheap these days so there is little reason to need to restrict a backup to one copy.

    2. Even if you have 100 backups on an external disk, everyone of them can be reduced to garbage by a single failure affecting the disk.

    I use more than one external HD and rotate them for secondary backup storage. My primary storage is a second internal HD on the machine(s). I do not copy every image to the secondary storage - only when I think I should.

    If you only have one backup, at the moment the partition is deleted on the PC being restored you have zero backups - the only thing you have is the image being restored and if it fails....
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.