kloning of a disk master slave

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by vschmid, Aug 30, 2007.

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  1. vschmid

    vschmid Registered Member

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    Hi,

    have a bootable IDE Disk which I want to replace because of critical noise
    it makes. I wanted to clon it with TRUE Image but when I was in the computer shop for buying the new disk they told me that to install this disk
    paralell I would have to set jumpers to Slave.
    Now I want to know if after finishing the cloning of the old disk do I have to
    reset this when I want to keep the deleted old disk as future second disk in the
    system.Or can I put the new disk in the system and have it jumpered also as
    master.?

    Any Idea or where I could find information about this.

    Thanks

    Volker from Stuttgart/Germany
     
  2. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Here's the procedure.

    1. Shut down your system.
    2. Jumper the new drive as Slave and connect it to the same cable as the Master drive.
    3. Boot from the Acronis TrueImage Recovery CD.
    4. Clone the old/Master drive (Source) to the new/Slave drive (Target).
    5. Shut down the system. (Do not allow the system to boot into Windows!)
    6. Remove the old/Master drive.
    7. Change the jumper on the new drive to Master.
    8. Boot from the new (and now) Master drive into Windows. Confirm that everything is running correctly.
    9. Shut down.
    10. Change the jumper on the old drive to Slave.
    11. Connect to the old (and now) Slave drive to the system.
    12. Boot the system into Windows and you can now reformat the old drive to use it as a data drive.

    This should be correct for Seagate and Maxtor and several other brands of IDE drives. However, Western Digital drives have a slightly different jumper system. If the old drive is a WD drive, it will have to be changed from the Master/Single jumper to the Master with Slave jumper at step 2 when you connect the new drive.

    Similarly, if the new drive is a WD drive, it will have to be jumpered Master/Single in step 7 and then to Master with Slave in step 10.
     
  3. Saltydog5

    Saltydog5 Registered Member

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    John,
    Today is my first day here and you've answered my first question before I asked it. Not trying to hijack this thread, but my son's HD is full and I'm getting ready to update his drive. I've always done it from scratch before but this time will be using TI9, updated as of today. The steps you outlined confirm what I thought to be true after numerous reading here. (esp how NOT to mess up the MBR by shutting down.) Thank you.

    Now if I may bother you or another with what remains. The current C drive is 27.5GB, and D (same phy. drive) is 9.76GB. The new drive is 160GB. I'd like to end up with a C of 80GB, a D of 60GB, and E of 20GB, where D&E will be for data storage. The old drive will be kept until I'm sure the system is good to go, then will be formated and used as offline storage via usb.

    If I understand the cloning process I'll need to use the Manual procedure vice Automatic. Where I get tripped up is it appears that I need to repartition the old drive (into 3 partitions) in order to end up with what I want on the new drive (3 partitions). Do I have this right? What are the risks with respect to destroying data? Also, step 12.3.11 "Cloning summary" in the manual says if I do not reboot the process is stopped. Is this the 'shutdown point' and is the manual wrong?
    thanks,
    sd5
     
  4. Saltydog5

    Saltydog5 Registered Member

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    Oops, forgot to add this

    Just a thought, but would it be easier to use Automatic and As Is, then go back resize the partitions and recover the unallocated area? Can I do all that with TI9 or do I need another program.
    thanks,sd5
     
  5. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Re: Oops, forgot to add this

    I believe in Manual you can select the new sizes for the C and D partitions and leave the rest as unallocated space. After successfully booting into Windows on the new, clone drive, you can use Windows Disk Manager to create the E partition and format it.
     
  6. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Right use Manual, but you don't partition the new drive before cloning. The cloning would wipe out the partitioning. When you clone from the Recovery CD, the process will finish and then you can shut down to swap the drive.

    See my other response for how to get C, D and E the way you want them.
     
  7. vschmid

    vschmid Registered Member

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    Thanks for your help John it worked well as you have described it.

    Volker
     
  8. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Thanks for letting us know that you were successful.
     
  9. Saltydog5

    Saltydog5 Registered Member

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    Thanks! and one more question?

    John,

    You're 2 for 2... my cloning came out exactly as planned. Thank you for your help, and Volker for not minding my barging into his thread.

    However, I do have a problem that stems from my not asking the right question. C and D are as I want them. The unallotted space, that is doing to be "E", and will be another 'storage area' is the size I want it. But here's the rub; I was just getting ready to go in using Disk Manager and was doing some 'refresh' when I found that you can only have one extended partition. As I see it I have two options. Make the unallocated into another primary... which will mess up my kids mind with the swapped drive letters, or copy the contents of D to C, delete the D partition, then create a new extended partition D that encompasses all remaining free space, then create a new Logical drive in the extended.

    Comments?

    thanks,
    sd5
     
  10. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Re: Thanks! and one more question?

    Hwy, you've got the opportunity to mess with your kids minds. Take advantage of it. Believe me, most of the time they'll just mess with yours. :D

    If you are a more compassionate father, you are right that you'll have to create a larger logical space with room for the two drives.

    If you have a program such as Acronis Disk Director, you can do this without deleting the partitions, but it may be cheaper to do that than to buy a new program.
     
  11. Saltydog5

    Saltydog5 Registered Member

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    John,
    I used Windows Disk Manager, deleted D, then recovered all the unallocated into an extended partition and put my two logical's in that. Worked great. I just recently gave up on 98SE, and am finding the more I use XP the more I like it.
    Thanks for all you help,
    sd5

    ps. and don't worry, I have plenty of other areas to mess with my kid's heads... it's just that I sometimes use his computer and I was really more worried I'd mess up where I stored stuff:eek:
     
  12. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Glad things worked out well.
    That's OK then. My kids are old enough now that they actually think I know stuff and ask for help. Well, one exception is my daughter in terms of caring for her babies. Somehow she has forgotten that her mother and I raised her and actually have some practical experience in dealing with babies. Perhaps it's because she was too young at the time to remember who changed her.:)
     
  13. Saltydog5

    Saltydog5 Registered Member

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    John,
    In a manner I have the best of both worlds. Two daughters with kids (who recall who powdered their butts!) and two teen/tween sons. My daughters were my 'training ground', both in what to do and not do. My sons benefit from it in a huge way... except when they try to pull the wool on me. They forget that not only did I probably do it, but it wasn't that long ago that their sisters tried too. They've all figured out, however, I'm a much better ally then adversary. :) My daughter's were both impressed that when I came to visit that not only did I remember how to change diapers, but was more than willing! (Not that I miss it though)
    Thanks for all your help John, and enjoy spoiling your kids and grandkids. There's no such thing as too much love.
    Adrian
     
  14. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Amen to that! It's really fun with grandkids where the parents have to be the responsible ones as best they can.:)

    Your family sounds like it's rock solid.
     
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