KeyScramber v3.12 Released

Discussion in 'other anti-malware software' started by mood, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    KeyScrambler v3.12 Released (September 8, 2018)
    Website
    What's New
    Download
    KeyScrambler 3.12 is released on September 8, 2018 with the following changes:
    • Fixes a potential crash in the encryption driver (thanks to TrustWave for the discovery).
    • Temporarily disables Edge support due to a compatibility issue. A new way to support Edge will be coming soon.
    The update has also added support for:
    • 3 more Browsers: Avast Secure Browser, Basilisk Browser, Iridium Browser (All editions)
    • 1 more Email and Messaging Program: WeChat for PC (Pro and Premium)
    • 2 more Password Managers: LastPass Pocket, PWGen (Pro and Premium)
    • 2 more Gaming Programs: Facebook Gameroom, Garena (Pro and Premium)
    • 5 more Encryption Programs: EncryptStick, Keybase, MikroLock, SafeNet Authentication Client, WinAuth (Premium)
    • 1 more Office Program: Turtl (Premium)
    • 1 more Team Messaging Program: Zoom (Premium)
    • 1 more Windows Feature: Microsoft Management Console (MMC) (Premium)
    List of all supported programs
     
  2. Beyonder

    Beyonder Registered Member

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    I'm not really filled with confidence by their over 1 year long delay. Edge didn't work at all with the version on their website and you had to email them to get a newer one. In a month, Windows 10 RS5 will release. Will they take a year to support that as well?
     
  3. ArchiveX

    ArchiveX Registered Member

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    "Better Late Than Never" ;)
    I'm glad for their Update :thumb:
     
  4. trott3r

    trott3r Registered Member

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    I dont think there is anything else similiar to this program that is supported.

    Zemana anti logger being the only other and not updated for longer.
     
  5. trott3r

    trott3r Registered Member

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    Had a look at their website $30 for pro version.
    Any discounts knocking around?

    If there are none at the moment are there any usually turning up during the year for example in giveaway of the day or other newsletters?
     
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    The free version has been discontinued. Are you saying the paid versions will end soon too?

    That would not surprise me because consumers have come to realize with modern versions of Windows a separate anti-keylogger is not needed when users keep the OS updated, use a decent regular anti-malware solution, and they avoid being "click-happy" on unsolicited links, downloads, attachments and popups.

    Ummm, 60+ browsers? :rolleyes: I'd like to see that list. The most comprehensive list of browsers I've seen includes 40 plus and most are just slight variations of Chrome, FF, and IE.
     
  7. trott3r

    trott3r Registered Member

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    It is not confirmed but plenty of people are speculating due to lack of updates.

    Its been menitoned on here that 2 important people have left the company
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, that's not a good sign, but I would not think Zemana AntiLogger is Zemana's flagship/cash-cow product. So unless more specific information says otherwise, I would think their departures are for other reasons. Like better job offers rather than being let go or run off.

    Our priorities definitely change when we get families and have to feed and shelter others.
     
  9. Beyonder

    Beyonder Registered Member

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    This is the list of browsers from their site. I'm not counting them though, I'm not that crazy.

    Advanced Browser, AM Browser, Amigo, AOL Desktop, AOL Explorer, AOL 9, Avant (Lite & Ultimate), Avast SafeZone, Avast Secure Browser, Avira Scout, Basilisk, Brave, Browser7, Cent, Citrio, Chromium Secure, Cliqz, Comodo Dragon, Comodo IceDragon, CometBird, Crazy Browser, Chromodo, Cyberfox, Epic, Flock, Green Browser, IceCat, Iridium, K-meleon, Lunascape, Maxthon, Maxthon Nitro, MSN Explorer, Netscape, Orca Browser, Otter Browser, Palemoon, Pirate Browser, QIP Surf, QupZilla, RockMelt, Safari for Windows, Seamonkey, SlimBoat, SlimBrowser, SlimJet, Sogou, SR Iron Browser, Superbird, 360 Browser (Firefox version), 360 Browser (Chrome version), TheWorld Browser, TOR browser, Torch, UC Browser, Vivaldi, WaterFox, WhiteHat Aviator, Yahoo Browser, and Yandex Browser.
    I have my doubts that's 60+ browsers though.
     
  10. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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    How about using an Outbound alerting firewall to prevent any info stealer from transmitting your information out instead? It will work for more than keyloggers...

    Don't let yourself be fooled by stuff like this.
     
  11. Beyonder

    Beyonder Registered Member

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    If the malware is on your computer, you're already ***.
     
  12. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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    Not at all! An info stealer (whether a keylogger or whatever) MUST be able to BOTH steal and then transmit. Blocking the stealing portion is optimal, but blocking the transmission part will also totally protect.

    The ability to block the transmission part is really important to acknowledge, but is sadly lost for many (like for those that think Windows Firewall is enough).
     
  13. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    @cruelsister- Is there possibly one or two of those strictly dedicated you personally might suggest (and is freeware/open source) which is fair in doing what is recommended in blocking outgoes only, which isn't required to have to dance you in circles or offered as an included feature in some program which isn't what we want. Standalone or solo type.

    Enlighten me
     
  14. arran

    arran Registered Member

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    Yea but a Firewall wouldn't stop a hacked browser addon from transmtting would it ? not unless you block the browser making outgoing connections but that would render the browser useless
    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/ne...o-steal-login-credentials-and-cryptocurrency/
    like this addon for example.

    My other question is do you know if Keyscramber v3.12 would protect against hacked browser addons ?
     
  15. guest

    guest Guest

    keyscrambler isn't about preventing or detecting or blocking keyloggers on your system, it is just a mitigating tool to fool the attacker in case you got compromised.
    So your datas are theoretically unreadable, it is a decent tool for Average Joe who can't handle more techie stuff.

    There is not the point of involving firewalls or AVs in the discussion.
     
  16. Pliskin

    Pliskin Registered Member

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  17. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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    Once you install a malicious addon you are screwed as you have already given it Carte Blanche. The very best way to protect against such malicious addons it to NEVER (never ever) install them.
     
  18. Floyd 57

    Floyd 57 Registered Member

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    Yeah right that will work, if the malware is something you coded :argh:
    Advanced malware that manages to run elevated (high or even system integrity level) one way or another, such as through another process etc. won't ask our firewall if it can access the internet, the days of old 2005 keyloggers are irrelevant, we're talking about real malware not your beginner code experiments


    Right, so when the browser gets exploited or hijacked (or bad extension) and it can read all keystrokes and send them to the malware author, we're supposed to block the browser in the firewall preemptively? Good thing browsers don't need internet connection anyway, cruelsister logic really is on point today!

    Ahh yes, you're correct. Shame on us for not knowing MEGA extension will be hacked, we shouldn't install any extension just in case it gets hacked (or is malicious by default). Better yet, plug my ethernet cable off, see ya malware! Cruelsister knew it all along!
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
  19. ichito

    ichito Registered Member

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    @Floyd 57
    Haha...fantastic...I see you are so wise so I dare to ask you - what is your proposition?
     
  20. Floyd 57

    Floyd 57 Registered Member

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    I don't claim to know everything, I'm just saying what I think I know, get it? If cruelsister thinks I'm wrong, she can bring useful arguments and we can sort this out, I don't say my arguments as facts, you're free to trust whoever you want, I'm arguing for other sakes not yours specifically (or not so specifically) :)

    I am saying that, for the average user, a keystroke encryptor is certainly useful, unlike what cruelsister is saying (duh just block it in firewall how hard it is? duh just don't install any extensions duh)
     
  21. guest

    guest Guest

    No, because Chrome is still Chrome, once you've allowed an extension access to Chrome processes and memory, nothing can be done.

    the only thing i can see to prevent this is to found out what IP the addon is calling and create a dedicated block rule for Chrome, but of course you must know first that the extension is malicious LOL.
     
  22. Floyd 57

    Floyd 57 Registered Member

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    Long live 2FA! Every payment-related account you have such as bank account and paypal should have 2FA, even better if it's not sms 2FA (as we saw with reddit hack recently), as well as your primary emails, usually gmail
    So this way, even if your accounts' credentials get compromised, you still have something to fall back on (2FA), and unless it's the NSA, the malware author ain't gonna bother with your 2FA so at least your banking is safe, and you probably have nothing valuable in your other accounts (such as this forum account for example)

    Also, change passwords every like 1-2 months, there are a lot of credentials on the dark/deep web of compromised accounts. Some of which you can check with these sites: https://hacked-emails.com and https://haveibeenpwned.com
     
  23. arran

    arran Registered Member

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    I have a solution. Use a separate browser with ZERO addon's for important things like online banking, email etc
    and you can even go a step further using your firewall and only allow the browser to connect to the IP addresses
    of your bank / email etc all other traffic is blocked.
     
  24. Floyd 57

    Floyd 57 Registered Member

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    Yep, a brand new VM for banking is also a good idea, so you know you're clean
     
  25. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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    Floyd- You are correct. I obviously have absolutely no idea about computer security (after all, I'm only a Girl). Add as many addons and extensions as you see fit.
     
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