Kaspersky Really Secure?

Discussion in 'other anti-virus software' started by tomdy2k, Sep 29, 2012.

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  1. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    Yes, in a scenario where Kaspersky has decided they want to target you and they are intent on doing whatever it takes, killing the information flow to their cloud won't save you. Kaspersky could try to get at you via special payload in their client software, hacking into your systems some other way, or asking the Kremlin to take care of it. Maybe if you are lucky they'll send someone sultry to seduce you! How about a different scenario though. Where Kaspersky simply processes the information that flows into their cloud, sharing anything that looks interesting with the Kremlin? Or one where the Kremlin has an operative within Kaspersky that grabs what they can? In those scenarios, killing the information flow to their cloud could save you. Here I'm sticking with the Kaspersky/Kremlin scenario, but I personally don't consider that a special case. Various other combinations are equally possible IMO. Including NON-state actors trying to blackmail or otherwise exert control over security vendors, cases where the ultimate beneficiary is a corporation that is using government connections to get at competitor information, etc.

    Joe Nobody *might* not need to worry about these types of things, but there are many people who do.
     
  2. qakbot

    qakbot Registered Member

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    I think when using Kaspersky's products you have far bigger things to worry about than what they are going to share with their Government. I am more concerned about what the company itself will do with your data.

    Is it an ethical company, do you trust them ?
    Do you understand the laws that govern them in their home country ?
    What legal recourse do you have in Russia should their servers be compromised and your data is stolen ? Likely none!

    For all these reasons I will not use Kaspersky products.
     
  3. The Red Moon

    The Red Moon Registered Member

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    What a ridiculously invalid comment that is.!:eek:
    That is a comment that could be applied to every security vendor on earth.
    Norton!can they be trustedo_O
    Comodo?
    The list could go on but to pick out kaspersky is infantile and even bordering on moronic.
    This is a paranoid state of mind which creates such useless comments.:ninja:
     
  4. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    You have a point.

    However, most if not all American security companies do share/sell your data.
    Not living in Russia, I would feel more comfortable with Kaspersky than American companies in that regard.
     
  5. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    If it bothered me I would not use it. However, it doesn't and I like KIS 2013.
    Jerry
     
  6. the Tester

    the Tester Registered Member

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    I would be more concerned about governmental spying than any antivirus.
    What about Microsoft? Could they be spying on you? You could speculate on any number of entities spying.....
     
  7. hamlet

    hamlet Registered Member

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    I also think government spying on its citizens is a bigger concern and a much more likely event than a computer security company intentionally breaching the safety and security of its users. Kaspersky has probably the longest sustained record of top quality success in the anti-malware product world. They have been around a long time in "Internet time" and from what I can remember have always been rated highly on whatever test you choose to pick. It just would not make any sense for them to compromise their user base. Their business would shrink pretty quickly in that scenario.

    I admit to forming an opinion from merely reading about the guy and it could be bogus info, but I am still not a huge fan of Eugene Kaspersky as a person. He seems to be a bit over the top personality wise ... not exactly my cup of tea. It does work for him and his company, however. If his products worked better on my current desktop computer, I would probably patronize the company and feel very, very good about my security. As it is, I send my money to a few other companies who provide decent protection and seem to have excellent operating principles.
     
  8. qakbot

    qakbot Registered Member

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    He is related to Melih of COMODO.:D
     
  9. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

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    Use a re-seller if your really that worried, want BD engine without that countries politics, get G-data, etc etc.
     
  10. vojta

    vojta Registered Member

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    Same anti-Russian propaganda again? Did you read my reply to you here?:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=2111574&postcount=33

     
  11. Baz_kasp

    Baz_kasp Registered Member

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    ^ Well done to the post above, actually adding some substance to a claim than just blowing hot air around.

    Also, those of you who think your AV software is spying on you really need to stop kidding yourselves that your lives are so interesting. I am sure your respective governments have more pressing issues to worry about than someone who spends their time arguing about antivirus software on a computer security forum :)
     
  12. fax

    fax Registered Member

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    This discussion makes little sense. Kaspersky has even a special task force to investigate for governemnt sponsored malware and there is also evidence that some government sponsored malware decided not to install if they detect Kaspersky (e.g. Gauss). The questions is are there other companies investing as much as Kaspersky in combacting governement sponsored malware? ;)
     
  13. trjam

    trjam Registered Member

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    Close. The entire question is just, plain stupid.

    Everything today is scrutinized. Eugene Kaspersky has one goal and that is to market one of the best security products today. Not to play a part in "Get Smart".

    I trust Kaspersky, actually more, then a few US security products based here at home.

    Yes I am as patriotic as they come, but if you think for one minute I think the US system is infalible, then you are crazy.
     
  14. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    That POV might make sense if the spying were limited to "arguing about antivirus software on computer security forums" and/or the spying was so expensive in terms of time, money, resources, etc that it was only done in very special cases. Today, "spying" is done (for all sorts of non-commercial and commercial purposes) in a routine and automated manner. Cloud anti-virus systems are one of the very best ways to carry out such spying. You get privileged software running on hundreds of millions of platforms (of different types) which can (depending on config of course) collect information about HTTP activity, *HTTPS activity*, programs being run *including those that didn't come from the net and you might not have seen via other approaches*, *private network activity*, etc. The software can send all of that information to the security vendor's cloud along with a GUID so all of that information is tied together, and the GUID can be associated with a device or account for which personal information is known, thereby connecting personal information with everything that was collected. The best part? It is (supposedly) security software and everybody needs that, right? Users literally *invite* the spy in. If you were a government agency (or a corporation with a thirst for detailed information about consumers, or ...) looking for a good place to tap in, would you not want to tap in to AV clouds somehow? I know I would. I would do my best to get some influence over the implementation of those systems and to assure that the information categories of interest gets phoned home and into my lap.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
  15. vojta

    vojta Registered Member

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    This is the same story that Kaspersky tells but from Symantec point of view. A great reading:

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/07/how-digital-detectives-deciphered-stuxnet/all/
     
  16. superssjdan

    superssjdan Registered Member

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    Smells to me like an attempt by the U.S. government and it's allies to try and discredit Mr. Kaspersky and hurt his business as these allegations are not new and the frequency of these allegations has increased since Kaspersky has been front and center in exposing government sponsored malware.It's shameful and ludicrous what has been said.I have used Kaspersky products on a few machines since 2008 and it does exactly what it is supposed to do..protect you from malware.I have never ever had an infection on any Kaspersky protected pc of mine.Not a single one.Same goes for WSA as well as a sidenote.For someone to come into these forums and infer what has been inferred about Mr. Kaspersky is libelous and shameful and this thread deserves nothing less than a big red x that says closed as it serves no purpose other than for ignorant people to air their deep rooted prejudices and paranoia.
     
  17. Baz_kasp

    Baz_kasp Registered Member

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    Not really... governments have a hard time keeping track of the people that matter as it is. Adding in a bunch of 'noise' from John Doe users posting via their SSL connections to Wilders, buying a pair of pants on eBay or organising their next book club via email isn't really interesting data.

    People, really stop kidding yourselves that your computer data matters so much to the government. They already have the most important data about you- DoB, Name, Address...if they really wanted to spy on you they'd be doing it already in a more conventional way. If you've done something bad the last thing you should be worrying about is if your anti virus application is snooping on you.
     
  18. qakbot

    qakbot Registered Member

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    Yeah, but are they enforced. The Mafia rules the roost in that country. Organized crime is rampant. Just look at all the organized malware orginating from Russia. The laws are there for show.

    The mafia even gave the government and Kaspersky the MIDDLE FINGER by kidnapping Kaspersky's son!!!

    And btw, you still haven't answered my question on what legal recourse you would have if your data that sits on a server in Russia is compromised and your data is then used to steal your identity ?
     
  19. trjam

    trjam Registered Member

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    Oh, so you must live in a perfect country with a perfect government.:cautious:

    Pray tell, which one might that be.
     
  20. vojta

    vojta Registered Member

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    That's all speculation that doesn't interest me in the slightest. I just refuted your missinformation in the interest of this forum's users ........... twice. That's all. I really don't care about your agenda.

    And about your question, I must say that you obviously don't understand what you read. For the third time:



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_pr...laws_in_Russia

    Applicable Data Protection (Privacy) Legislation in Russia

    1.1 Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data, signed and ratified by the Russian Federation on December, 19 2005;

    1.2 the Law of the Russian Federation “On Personal Data” as of 27.07.2006 No. 152-FZ, regulating the processing of personal data by means of automation equipment. It is the operator who is required to comply with that Act;

    1.3 the “Regulations on securing personal data being processed in personal data systems” enacted by the Russian Government Regulation as of 17.11.2007 No. 781. The Regulations contain mandatory security regulations to be complied with when processing and storing personal data;

    1.4 the Federal law “On Advertisement” as of 13.03.2006 No. 38-FZ. This regulates marketing communications sent inter alia by electronic means including e-mail, SMS etc.;

    1.5 the Russian Code on Administrative Infractions dated 30.12.2001 No.195-FZ. This regulates issues of responsibility for commission of administrative offences in connection with processing of personal data or distribution of marketing communications.
     
  21. Baz_kasp

    Baz_kasp Registered Member

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    What legal recourse would you have in yours if your data was stolen from a server (in your country)?


    If you think the police are going to investigate your individual case and bring the perps to justice you are having a laugh. Put simply, they do not have the resources to do this.

    Your bank would cancel your cards and reissue new ones, reimburse you for any monies lost and tell you to check your credit report for signs of fraud in future, end of.

    If you report a 'crime' having been committed, the police would (probably) give you a case reference and promptly close it due to 'lack of evidence'.

    Further reading for you: https://clientsites.linklaters.com/Clients/dataprotected/Pages/Russia.aspx
     
  22. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    What data do they have? I doubt they have anything but maybe a list of the files on my PC, probably only executable files at that, and even then are they identifiable to me? What kind of info would you have given them to even worry about it?
     
  23. fax

    fax Registered Member

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    Oooh sh**t they stolen my precious cooking recepies damn Kaspersky :D :D
     
  24. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    Maybe. Then again, maybe that is just what they WANT us to think! Mr. Kaspersky uses the US government calling on Indiana Jones for expertise as an example? Mr. Kaspersky has an industrial control system like that which was attacked by Stuxnet in a very limited access room? Hmmm. Maybe the US Government called on Kaspersky to help create Stuxnet, which is why he has one of those tucked away, and the articles were meant to create/reinforce distance between the US government and Kaspersky! Or maybe, it was meant to inform Iran of and lure Iran into purchasing Kaspersky's control system anti-malware, which will make them feel safe and lower their guard, but in reality it will have a known-to-few weakness that will be exploited in the next attack! Or .... :)

    I would think the art of processing large amounts of datapoints and boiling that down to detailed profiles on people fairly advanced given that commercial entities have been using that for targeted advertising for years. I suspect the agencies just might have a few tricks up their sleeves as well. I mean, considering they have run large data collection and analysis projects in the past and are surely doing so now. However, I will for just a moment adopt your don't worry, can't happen attitude. It is SO much nicer to think we live in a world where the spying doesn't happen :)
     
  25. Amin

    Amin Registered Member

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    kaspersky's country of origin is the one which always betrayed my country during history , alwaysssss, and this is not a joke :blink:
    a very little documentation :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Turkmenchay

    that's why i never trust a russian software.:thumbd:
     
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