ISP IP Tracking?

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by Brandonn2010, Nov 10, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Brandonn2010

    Brandonn2010 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Posts:
    1,849
    So if I understand correctly, your ISP, in my case Comcast, tracks every site you go to?

    Does switching your DNS from your ISP, in my case to Norton DNS, not allow them to do this?
     
  2. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    Posts:
    2,016
    Location:
    North America
    Your first question is accurately answered as yes they can. Do they sit and watch you traverse the web, no. But everything you visit they can and usually do log. Yes, they can still do this even if you use an external DNS. Only by using an external proxy can you avoid that. In such a case it is still wise ((and in some cases required)) to change your DNS to either the proxy/VPN provider or another "safer" DNS provider. My understanding is that even if you use a VPN, it is possible for your ISP to log your DNS requests and therefore have an idea of where you're going, even if they can't actually see what you're doing while there due to the VPN/proxy.
     
  3. Brandonn2010

    Brandonn2010 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Posts:
    1,849
    Are there any sites that raise a red flag for them and would make them start monitoring me? Why do they record every site you go to?
     
  4. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Posts:
    7,779
    Ordinarily, everything you do flows thru your ISP, so theoretically, they can see everything you do if they wanted to. They are probably obligated to log certain things (I don't know exactly what) due to regulations of some sort or other. Who knows....

    I have heard that some large ISP's such as Time Warner and others are soon going to start monitoring P2P traffic, movie and mp3 downloads, and so on, anything related to piracy. They will supposedly issue a few warnings, and if you don't take heed, they can apparently cut your service or something similar. All in an attempt to curb piracy I believe. Perhaps they've already started, I don't know....
     
  5. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    Posts:
    2,016
    Location:
    North America
    Kerodo is talking about the "Strike Policy" that is actually now in effect. Here is an earlier article about the plan: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/10/isp-file-sharing-monitoring/.

    There currently are no mandated data retention laws in the U.S. Data retention varies by ISP, a general idea ((though not guaranteed to be accurate right to this minute)) can be found here: http://torrentfreak.com/how-long-does-your-isp-store-ip-address-logs-120629/.

    What do they log? Well, of course your IP address ((past and present)), IP addresses visited, downloads, email activity included the addresses you send to and receive from and so on. Filters are in place for specific "areas of interest" that will get flagged by automated systems ((Information about the filters comes from people I know that work for two major ISP providers.)). Of course that's not really that important since the government has its own systems to flag such activities, that being something an entire thread could be devoted to really. Basically consider ISPs to be able to see just about anything they want, if they are so inclined.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  6. Sir paranoids

    Sir paranoids Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2012
    Posts:
    101
    my isp doesn't do that, and if a isp did start with me on that topic id change isp. :cautious:
     
  7. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Posts:
    1,439
    VPN (No Logs) + DNS (German/Swiss privacy association). (FireFox)-(HTTPS Everywhere + NoScript)

    This will cost you about $50-$100 a year.

    This is really the only way to avoid your ISP safely.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.