is really so strong the apple iphone encrypt engine?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by mantra, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    Hi
    i don't want to go into the merits , what did happen about the tragedy of San Bernardino attack

    but about apple , is really so strong the iphone encrypt engine , seeing the facts , the fbi and national security should easily decrypt the apple phones

    i'm wonder if other brand like samsung or Huawei have such strong encrypt engine


    just curious , because nasa has the most advanced technology

    thanks
     
  2. 1PW

    1PW Registered Member

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    Hello mantra:

    Even with the impressive computing power available to a few nation states, brute force cracking AES 256-bit encryption is no trivial matter.

    It might surprise you that NASA simply lacks the reasonable computing power for the above task. Reference: http://www.top500.org/

    Perhaps a visit to any of the top three U.S. weapons laboratories is more in line with your theory. Better yet, maybe some of the toys employed by the folks of 9800 Savage Road, Fort Meade Maryland are the most suited to the task.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  3. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    hi
    but in the past they have easily unhinge/break laptop and other device encrypted
    they and the european secret servies do such things daily without using quantum computer
    i'm wonder about cinese smartphone mobiles, seeing the antagonism versus some nations

    thanks 1PW
     
  4. 1PW

    1PW Registered Member

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  5. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    Mantra,

    Actually this thread sort of misses the problem in this specific case. The new Apple phone will self-destruct after 10 incorrect/missed code attempts. This hardware feature locked into the device is what is causing the issues. In a normal encryption scheme the NSA could break into what is likely to be a 4 - 6 digit passcode in seconds. Cleverly the device is constructed very securely so that brute forcing will certainly wipe the phone and they lose everything then.
     
  6. haakon

    haakon Registered Member

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    Also the timing between failed attempts increases incrementally with each failure. After the ninth failure one has to wait one hour to attempt the tenth, then destruct if failed upon that. What a sick and twisted scheme. I love it. :D

    I stand to be corrected, but I believe this self-destruct feature can be toggled in the user settings although I don't know if it's enabled by default.

    From what I've read, disabling the self-destruct is easily, and has been, met by Apple in their labs so then there is no limit to the PINs that can be tried.

    Also at issue is the time required for PIN key derivation which I recall is 80 milliseconds. A method to reduce this timing has been requested.
     
  7. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    Palancar good very good point , i missed the new feature
    hi
    android or even windows encrypt program (truectypt o veracrypt) do miss such high security features
     
  8. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    According to:

    http://www.theguardian.com/technolo...ceo-tim-cook-government-fbi-iphone-encryption

    Apple engineers are already investigating how to pull up the drawbridge for future products/upgrades so that they will no longer be in this position.
     
  9. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    It comes down to a difference in application needs/usage. On my encrypted OS's you would have to brute force my 40+ character passcode to get in, which of course is never going to happen. Other than a "5 dollar wrench attack" I am good to go!

    For my smartphone(s) I have no intention of keying a 40 character passcode every time I use my phone. With the highly repetitive nature of daily phone use, this Apple hardware lock makes a 5 digit passcode very unlikely to be broken with a 10 attempt limit.

    I still feel more confident that my OS will not be broken into because I more completely control it. However; the Apple lock is doing just what its designed to do.
     
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