Interview With DHS Head Michael Chertoff

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by dw426, Aug 7, 2008.

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  1. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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  2. KookyMan

    KookyMan Registered Member

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    Interesting reading.

    Though I must say, I am getting curious when he says that encrypted systems in which the users won't supply a password they will decrypt them.

    I am wondering how they are planning to decrypt some of these "secure" methods. Are they running dictionary/brute force against passwords or what?
     
  3. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Well, that's the problem, we don't know and I have very high doubts they'll openly discuss it. We know brute force as we know it isn't gonna work against any decent algorithm. But will they exploit some flaw or just use some method we don't know about? That remains to be seen. The problem is, we can't merely count on what we THINK they have available such as resources or tech, we have to wonder about what is technologically possible even if we don't know it actively exists yet. I'm not making a political statement or bringing up any "Big Brother" theories, but there are as fact a number of "black" projects going on at any given time, whether in the NSA/CIA buildings in Washington or out at some remote military installation. Lockheed doesn't have a "Skunkworks" facility because they're dealing with smelly things. New tech is almost always a military project first that gets handed down to civilian applications.

    So, the answer is, unless someone starts spilling beans so to speak, nobody knows their plans or what they can/can't do. All I can say is pray that legislation doesn't swing their way and allow them to make people turn over passwords. Because when that happens, you truly are left without many options.
     
  4. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    That will happen.

    As has been demonstrated time-and-time again, there are not enough of us informed, committed or involved enough to present a serious challenge to measures such as those - and the government knows it.

    And apparently, the "iPatriot" Act is waiting in the wings: http://www.yff365.com/profiles/blog/show?id=2162281:BlogPost:5863 t鱸o tidy up the loose strings of whatever they've over-looked so far.

    Happy trails, people. Pete
     
  5. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    I personally agree legislation will pass to force password retrieval. We can go back and forth all day about the vast majority does or doesn't use it for crime (and please let's not for the sake of keeping the thread open), but the fact is that it IS used for it, and it's a simple and effective way to hide crime (if we keep out the theories that there are ways to get around it unknown to the public). So yes, I do see it coming, if not within a year or two, then not too far afterwards in my opinion.

    I can only take as opinion the other article you linked since there is so far no proof readily available, but I do agree with the professor. The government has long known that the web is a prime target and it's entirely plausible they have an internet-based Patriot Act ready to roll. I don't however think that an attack will bring it in to action, I believe it will be put in place before one to attempt to prevent it. We'll see what happens in the next couple of years if that long.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2008
  6. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    The funny part (at least for me) about all of this is: the fact that Seven in 10 government mobile devices unencrypted "while six federal agencies’ encryption installations may not work as intended." Do you really think they can decrypt a laptop when their own systems are wide open?

    Instead of obsessing about laptops at the border, they should look at this Survey: More than 10,000 laptops lost each week at airports. With a reported 637,000 laptops lost each year, there's plenty of fish in the sea to keep Homeland Security super busy.
     
  7. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    The funny part of your point (and it isn't a bad one) is that government spending works in a really screwed up way. I have worked for them in the past, and I can tell you that money for THEM usually trickles in as leftovers from other spending. Also, depending on the organization, some are not even on the Internet. What the stories don't tell you is that these "lost" systems are usually merely victims of carelessness and not theft. Some are taken home, some are left in other places on the premises, some are accidentally put into storage. Believe me, crazy things go on in government facilities. They are VERY good at placing financial emphasis on pet projects.

    You can place some of the blame on Congress, they are also very good at sending money for national security, but not government property security. It can be a funhouse :)
     
  8. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    dw426, I know exactly what you're talking about!

    While in the Armed Forces, I was involved in a new aircraft project, with parts procurement experience during my last year of service. Congress spent a ton of money to acquire the new aircraft, and didn't have anything left for spare parts. That's where I learned the term "cannibalization" and the art of it, in order to keep the fleet going, while waiting for the next cycle of budget appropriations. Funhouse is the proper way to describe it! :thumb:
     
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