internet disconnect switch

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Shankle, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. Shankle

    Shankle Registered Member

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    Thank you Minimalist.
    That is the one I am talking about.
    So "justhitthebutton" is a real rip-off . They have the
    gall to charge $50 for the same switch.
    $10+ at Amazon is a decent price.
     
  2. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    You're welcome. 50$ is definitely too much.
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I really think a physical/mechanical device is not the best solution. In fact, I think it is a bad solution.

    Instead of two RJ-45 connectors and one length of Ethernet cable between your computer and the router, with a switch, now you have two more (4 total) RF-45 connectors, 2 more Ethernet ports on the switch, internal connections to each side of actual switch, another length of Ethernet cable, plus the switch contacts inside the switch itself all between your computer and the router. That is a lot of potential points of failure for possible network connection problems to arise. The Ethernet cable is a simple, but extremely critical network device that can definitely impact network performance.

    I think you should seriously consider the CrystalRich InternetOff software switch I originally linked to a week ago as the better (and free) solution. The fact you can schedule disabling access is a HUGE boon IMO as that means you can tell it to always disconnect from 6PM at night to 6AM in the morning for example - so if you forget or suddenly get called away and can't flip the switch, Internet access will automatically be cut throughout the night. And the fact you can set a password to regain access should appeal to your security conscious side. This will prevent a nosy guest from accessing the Internet and perhaps infect your computer or use it for other nefarious deeds.

    Being free, what have you got to lose for trying it out?
     
  4. jwcca

    jwcca Registered Member

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    Windows Firewall Control by Binisoft also offers a reasonably easy/quick way to block traffic using the High Filtering Profile.
    Right click on the systray icon, move the cursor to Profiles and left click on High Filtering
    It can also block all traffic during boot-up, see the Security tab option to set Secure Boot.

    This is DonationWare to get all the features but there is a Free version as well (last time I checked). I've donated twice now to support the developer who is very actively improving the app, see the thread here in Wilders.
     
  5. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I guess it all depends on user's needs. I can easily see a situation where it could be useful. If a user handles some sensitive data and needs internet only occasionally, or needs to disconnect in a moment if necessary, they could use this switch. Hardware disconnect is IMO more reliable solution than any software or even OS itself. If you don't have router near your computer and don't want to climb under table to disconnect ethernet cable, this little switch could be quite useful.
     
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Nah. Don't agree with that at all. Mechanical devices WILL break and wear out. As noted above, this device adds at least a 1/2 dozen connection points in the path. More connections in an electrical circuit is never good. Each one, even if top quality and condition, adds resistance and each one adds a potential point of failure. Is that a "minimalist" approach? ;)

    I don't see how flipping a mechanical switch is any easier than clicking an icon. Is more wires and another box on our computer desk really better than a system tray icon? What if you forget to flip it? With software, you can schedule no access to happen automatically. And it is easy to verify it is working by looking at the network icon in the system tray, and/or the LED for that Ethernet port on the router.
     
  7. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I guess we just don't agree about this. Using switch instead of installing software to disconnect from net is minimalist approach ;)
    For 10$ I wouldn't really care if it breaks, I'd just buy another one :)
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    "Minimalist" with a capital M, maybe. But not minimalist. ;)
    Well, then you are out $20 instead of nothing.
     
  9. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    The light switches in houses are mechanical and they hardly ever break. 1/2 dozen connections? You're basically adding one extra cable if you buy a prebuilt solution. If you make your own, you can just mod your existing ethernet cable.

    I could say the same thing about a software solution. Software solutions WILL eventually error. More software on a pc is never good. Each one, even if top quality, adds bloat and adds a potential point of failure. Is that a "minimalist" approach?
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Software does not wear out so you cannot say it will eventually fail.

    No! One extra cable is NOT one extra connection. It is 4. The jacks each connector plug into, plus the crimp points inside each connector. Then the wires connect to the switch, then there are switch contacts themselves. So there are at least a 1/2 dozen extra "connection" points with this switch added to that Ethernet circuit.

    Home light switches are very robust because they are designed to be rough handled AND to support much higher voltages.
     
  11. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    But no software is free of bugs.

    These points are nonsense. How many different connection points are in the computer itself? How do data centers manage with thousands upon thousands of ethernet ports? Sure mathematically it's an amplified failure rate but realistically, the failure rate is very marginally increased.

    Man, they must be replacing ethernet cables and hardware all the time!
    http://pull01.zerolag.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/gaming-servers.jpg
    http://pull01.zerolag.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/gaming-servers.jpg
     
  12. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I guess we just disagree...
     
  13. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Come on. Software does not suddenly catch a new bug like a person catches a cold. You are just being argumentative now. I made my point.
     
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