Inside my computer is dusty lol ?????

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by SonyaM32, Jun 12, 2005.

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  1. SonyaM32

    SonyaM32 Registered Member

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    If this is in the wrong forum, please move it.
    I need help with the best way to get the dust off that is all over my mother board. My computer is on ALL the time. I only turn it off sometimes. And I know from my old 1998 computer, that dust is probably caked inside my new one too. I have had this new PC since OCT, 04.
    Well, I won't go into how I used a dust broom on my old one, because the hair dryer would not work, because it was dusty so bad, LOL
    I want to take care of my new one, and with that fan thing running, I know it has to be dusty. And I dust broomed my old one out once a month. I live in Fla. and my bedroom alone gets dusty everyday.
    Someone told me to use a can of aresol on my old computer a while back. But if it is over $10 a bottle, I won't do it. And where would I find just plain aresol?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    WalMart has compressed air for cleaning computers.
     
  3. Notok

    Notok Registered Member

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    Here's a good guide :)
    http://www.computerhope.com/cleaning.htm

    You just gotta be careful with the compressed air around fans, sometimes it can force dust into the bearings and kill the fans after a couple weeks. The bigger fans are a little more resiliant, but you have to be really careful with the small ones. It's better to use swabs or something for things like the video card fan.
     
  4. hadi

    hadi Guest

    Or use blower, also you can use domestic vacumcleaner if it has a reverse hole to blow air out, or a hair dryer set to "cold not hot" and maximum blowing make a half-cone shaped paper and put it on its blowing mouth (hole) to increase air jet
     
  5. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    I use a small brush which is made specifically for cleaning the PCs. Once I'm finished with the cleaning, its time to take a bath! :D


    JOKE:Ya, you can use a really big graphics card fan to blow off all the dust, the best fan for this job would the the "Dustbuster" fan found on the GeForce FX 5800 Ultra! :D

    <Do keep in mind that the Dustbuster fan is extrememly noisy!> :D:D:D
     
  6. SonyaM32

    SonyaM32 Registered Member

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    LOL :D :D :D :D
     
  7. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    I use a (central) vacuum cleaner with plastic slotted attachment. Dust from computers can be toxic and I don't want to blow it all over only for it to be sucked back in - or worse, breathed in.
     
  8. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    Canned air and/or a small vaccuum with a soft bristle end has always worked for me.
     
  9. hadi

    hadi Guest

    hi
    blowing should be done in an open area, balcony for ex. Put your finger over the fan so that it wont rotate during hard blowing. Also dont forget to (clean)blow thru the holes of the power supply (from rear and front) and the heat sink guts. you wont know how much dust lies in there. I blow the dust every 2 months.
     
  10. vacuum it

    vacuum it Guest

    I just carefully vacuum out my computer, very carefully, every once in a while. I notice my video card gets full of dust right around the fan so I very carefully vacuum all the dust away with my regular vacuum (use hose attachment w/ slotted attachment like Lynchknot ;) ). I also vacuum out the interior bottom, and around any fans (like on the power supply), but I NEVER vacuum any dust that may be on the motherboard itself, to do so could ruin your computer. Compressed air is best for that part. Putting the vacuum in reverse can just blow more dust back on your computer again, no matter how good you clean the vacuum first.
     
  11. hadi

    hadi Guest

    HOW? there are vacuums that suck from one end and blow from another (different end)(like electrolux royale). so how you put more dust where infact the air blowed is first passes inside the vacuum through the dustbag (ie. air comes out clean especialy if the dustbag is new). I'm using it. Fast air jet insde CPU wont do any damage at all. it cleans especially heat sink and power unit. sucking the dust wont clean hidden places like heatsink and inside of power unit
     
  12. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    Would you trust your vacuum cleaner bag enough to put the nozzle up to your mouth and take a deep breath? Perhaps with a HEPA filter or Micron Filter - but a regular bag blows particles of dust back out into the room.

    I vacuum my motherbord but I don't actually touch the board. The vacuum has enough suction to pull most of the dust off the board, holding it a quarter inch away from it.. In time I will probably have to use a small brush - maybe tape an electronics cleaning brush to the attachment.

     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2005
  13. hadi

    hadi Guest

    1-Dont get me wrong. the vacuum (with clean bag) is sucking the same air that we breath. the only difference its directing it with a little force (pressure).
    2- blowing CPU is far butter. try it and see howmuch hidden dust your computer is clogged with. the dust inside heatsink wont move unless with strong blow of air jet, same goes for inside of the power unit.and its more important to free the inside of the power uinit from dust, it is the one that take air out from within itself and from inside the whole CPU as well.
     
  14. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    1. Unless you are using a brand new vacuum with a brand new bag, it is blowing particles of dust, mold, ect. that remain in the cleaner's internals.

    2. You would be amazed at how powerful a central vacuum can suck - especially with a slotted attachment. If need be, in the future, I may resort to compressed air and a vacuum combined - at which point I would first try: removing the fan and using a brush. Blowing, blows into the rooms atmosphere, which eventually leads back to my computer (the source of my room's "vacuum")

    I am considering a cutting a piece of low drag vacuum cleaner filter for my computer's inlets as there is enough suction to hold a legal sheet of paper to the side of my computer
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2005
  15. Cochise

    Cochise A missed friend

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    I just take mine into the Shower or the Bath with me once a Month and just splash around, then a quick blow-dry, a dash of Deoderant and we're both ready to get back on line....job done.......just remember to unplug first....I have to because the lead doesn't reach to the Bath-room......... :D


    Cochise, :cool:
     
  16. Marja

    Marja Honestly, I'm not a bot!!

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    Do you use conditioner too??
     
  17. controler

    controler Guest

    If your going to blow, take it outside

    If you are going to suck, you should really be using a special vacume ( Which is conductive ) or you may damage your components.

    Household vacumes are not conductive. A special vacume is made of all conductive material.

    This is the correct way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Why because non conductive vacumes create alot of static, which is something you don't want & hell no you can't use cling free or any of those other fabric sprays LOL

    When you walk accross the carpet & touch the door knob or someones ear & they get a shock & you can see it, that is 10,000 volts of static electricity.

    Most semiconductors don't need much more then 2000 volts static to damage them, which BTW is an arc you don't see.
    controler
     
  18. controler

    controler Guest

    Just to keep this thread ahead of those trying to overrun it, Here is another tib bit of info for those that thought they came here & didn't learn something new today.


    For many years the Russian Migs used vacume tubes in their planes,

    Do you know why? was it because they were so far behind times?

    Well actualy no. They are impervious to a hydrogen bomd.

    When a hydrogen bomb explodes, it gives off a huge electromagnetic pulsed wich will fry normal semiconductors in a flash.

    The Russians could keep right on flying if a hydrogen bobm went off.

    I don't know about China but I do know the USA has sattalites that can creap up on other countries sattalites & use a electromagnetic pulsed to dissable them.

    Wierd huh?

    controler
     
  19. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    Vacuums should be conductive? I use a central vacuum. The vacuum is located a floor below me. All I have is a plastic hose and I never see any dust collect on the tip due to static. I touch and hold the case anyway to discharge any static that I may generate.
     
  20. controler

    controler Guest

    so you are saying you touch earth ground with one hand to the case which still has the power cord plugged in so it goes to earth ground, while vacuming with your third hand?

    Yes the vacume should be conductive. VAcumes that are conductive are usualy black, along with all the attachments.

    controler
     
  21. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    no need for sarcasm. I'm saying I don't have a problem. The end.

    I'm not sure what the model it is but this central vac is 12 gal. 240 volt commercial wet/dry. There's an outlet in the garage as well.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2005
  22. SonyaM32

    SonyaM32 Registered Member

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    hahaha :D
     
  23. controler

    controler Guest

    @ lynchknot

    lighten up dude, it was only a joke.

    You obveiously know more about electronics then I do.


    con
     
  24. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    lighten up? all I said was "no need for sarcasm" What's the big deal? o_O
    I don't know much about anything - only a little about everything (all I know is there's no static)
     
  25. controler

    controler Guest

    And all I am saying is unless your vacume HOSE is earth grounded and conductive, You do have static. It doesn't matter what kind of material your hose is. EVen a REAL antistatic vacume will generate static if say the earth ground prong has been removed.
    All it takes is to move the dust bunnies around and static is formed.

    If your vacume is labled antistatic & it is not conductive, I would wonder.




    That's all folks.

    Anyway since I have done elecrtronics for many years, I know for a fact you should use antistatic measures when working on electronics.
    If in dought, google the subject.

    I am not here to argue too much. Just state some facts.
    Just Google ESD or Electrostatic Discharge.

    controler
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2005
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