Inaccessible boot device

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by lagerstedt, Apr 17, 2006.

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  1. lagerstedt

    lagerstedt Registered Member

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    I have a problem. I get this Windows Stop message (BSOD):

    Stop 0x0000007B - Inaccessible Boot Device
    (0x85E50050) (0xC0000032) 0x00000000, 0x00000000

    I hope that I got all the details right.

    Windows 2000 Pro, SP 4, English version, NTFS on all three harddisks.

    I tried using the Recovery Console and ran fixmbr and fixboot but it did not help. I also ran SpinRite 6 level 2 and it could see all disks and no errors were found. The BIOS seems to work. I also ran chkdsk, no result.

    Using Disk Director 9.0.553 I could also see all partions but I did not dare use it. Have no idea about how to edit MBR etc.

    I have a two weeks old True Image backup of the whole disk (MBR etc included). I checked it via the TI boot CD and it is intact.
    I have TI 8.0.937. Should I restore over the current installation or should I get a new harddisk and restore on that one.

    Any help is welcome, indeed
     
  2. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hello lagerstedt,

    If you Google for "Stop 0x0000007B - Inaccessible Boot Device" you will find there are numerous causes for this error message. Personally, I would back up my current data files (My Documents folder, e-mail folder, etc.), restore the verified two week old "whole disk" image and then copy the data files back to the restored system.

    Regards
     
  3. lagerstedt

    lagerstedt Registered Member

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    Thanks for your answer. Yes, I even read all the information in W 2000 Resource Kit handbook. What you suggest is probably the most practical suggestion. What happened is probably that Windows cannot find a file and stops loading just before getting to the GUI. I do get the Windows 2000 logo and then it stops.

    So, I restore the TI backup on a new hardddisk and hope it will work that way. But what happens when I put the old harddisk back in the system as a slave to the new one and Windows finds two active partitions both called c:\?

    All the best,
     
  4. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Leave the old hard drive disconnected and let Window boot from the new drive for the first time. This will cause Windows to assign a new (correct) DiskID to the replacement system drive. Once Windows has done this there shouldn't be a problem when you then connect the old drive back into the system as a slave.

    Regards
     
  5. lagerstedt

    lagerstedt Registered Member

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    I have just restored from a True Image and it worked. Only som glitches. One was that Windows Srcipting Engine was gone. Easy to restore, though. Happened before so I had it already.

    I checked the old hdd with Hitachi's (aka IBM) disk checker and it found lots of errors on it, so I did not bother to reconnect it. It was more than five years old and I should have retired it earlier. I lost about two weeks of e-mail and some downloads. True Image is a real life saver.

    When the restore process was running I was confused by the renaming of the drives. There were messages like c:> k:. Then I realised that my original c:, d:, f: and g: did not exist, they were on the old hdd. They came back after the reboot. I looked for the image files on j: and found them on g:.

    Then I used Disk Director to resize the partions, since the new hdd was larger than the old one.

    Happy ending!
     
  6. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Glad you had a happy ending. Your drive letters were likely different during the restore process because the restore environment is Linux and it assigns drive letters differently than windows. For this reason it is good to have a meaningful disk label so you can tell what is on the partition without being concerned about drive letters.
     
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