Imaging for virtual machines...

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by yontev, Jan 13, 2008.

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  1. yontev

    yontev Registered Member

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    I am not very technical, so please explain with very simple terms. I am running virtual machines...Vista is the host and XP Pro is the Guest. Can I create images of both machines with one licensed copy of Acronis legally?

    If I can, how would I do so in technical terms. Which machine should Acronis be on to enable this to work?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Since the TI license is "one per computer", I think that you should be okay with one license. You can, for example, have Vista and XP installed on the same computer (dual-boot) and image both of them with one license. XP in a VM on Vista on the same computer isn't really any different.

    You can either install TI in the VM or boot to the TI ISO file and image the VM. This type of backup is no different than on a "real" computer. Just do it all from inside the VM. Depending on the VM software you use, you may need to backup to another virtual hard drive, shared folder or network share (for example, if USB support is not available).

    You can also just include the VM's hard drive file in the backup of Vista. Just make sure the VM isn't running when you back it up.

    Another option is to just copy the VM's hard drive file(s) to an alternate location (such as a USB hard drive or another internal drive). I normally do this as it's faster than using TI. I also have all my VM files in a dedicated partition so they don't get included in my main OS's backup.

    --------

    One other note: If you're using TI 11 in Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007, you'll need to either create an ISO with the additional parameter or use F11 at the Acronis menu and add it so the mouse will work. The parameter is: i8042.noloop
    When added to the F11 string it looks like: quiet i8042.noloop
     
  3. yontev

    yontev Registered Member

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    Boy...the stuff you wrote is way beyond me. I'm wondering if I'm just not technically skilled enough to work in the VM world.
     
  4. FBMachines

    FBMachines Registered Member

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    LOL, that's what this forum is for. It actually is easier than it sounds. Let’s start with..

    What virtual machine app are you using (VMWare Workstation 6, VMWare Server, Virtual PC 2007 or other)?

    One way to do it is...
    First create a rescue disk within ATI and instead of burning it to a disk save the ISO file to the hard drive.

    If you are using VMWare before you start your VM, you want to go to "Edit Virtual Machine Settings". Then in the hardware tab, highlight your CD-ROM device. On the right side of the form select the "Use ISO Image:" radio box then browse for the ATI ISO image you created earlier. When done, click on OK to save settings. Finally, start your VM and if prompted; boot from CD. This will launch the ATI recovery disk.

    Now if you are using Virtual PC, In the "Virtual PC Console" start the VM you want to use. When the VM window pops up, click on the "CD" menu item. Then click on "Capture ISO Image" and select the ATI ISO image created earlier. Once you do that, click on the action menu item then reset. This will reboot your VM and if prompted to boot from CD, do this. This will boot the ATI rescue disc.

    Once the rescue disc is booted you can backup or restore like normal.


    BTW, which version of ATI are you using?

    Corey

    Edit: Like MudCrab said, you could just backup the Vista drive and (assuming the XP VM file is on the Vista drive) it would be included in the Vista image. But, the above instructions will let you create a separate image for your XP virtual machine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2008
  5. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Sorry for that. I assumed you were more familiar with how Virtual Machines worked since you had it setup already. Also, my definition of "simple terms" may not be yours.

    Post back with the information requested by Corey and instructions can be provided as needed.
     
  6. yontev

    yontev Registered Member

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    I am sorry...my original post sounded like it was already set up. The truth is, I plan to set it up that way but haven't yet. I'm still evaluating which VM software would be for me. But I suppose I will be going with Microsoft's version. I will probably be using ATI 11.

    I have no idea if I have the technical skills to set up and run VM or whether my computer has the power to handle it...but since the ease of image-making is an important issue in evaluating whether VM is for me, I posted here.


    Corey, Would you advise installing Acronis on the host machine or the virtual machine? And when you mentioned rescue disk, do you mean the boot disk that you create to start Acronis at boot up? And if so, where do you advise to save that iso file, on the host machine or the virtual machine?


    Nancy
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2008
  7. FBMachines

    FBMachines Registered Member

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    Hey Nancy,
    Since this is your first VM attempt, I would recommend Microsoft's Virtual PC. IMO, I think it is a little more user friendly and it is free. So, if you get too frustrated and decide to throw in the towel you have not lost any money only time. (Like my grandpa told me one time, "I have more time than money") ;)

    Processor speed is important, but not nearly as important as memory. If you are running Vista chances are you have enough processor speed. How much RAM do you have installed? In Vista you can check by clicking on the start menu, then on the right side of the menu right-click on "Computer".

    The old debate about whether to backup "live" within Windows or to use a recovery disc and backup with the drive "locked" has been going on for a long time. They both have their pros and cons. Personally; I use a recovery disc to backup.

    Yes , the rescue disk I am referring to is the one you create to start Acronis True Image at boot-up. Save the ISO file on the host machine.

    Corey
     
  8. yontev

    yontev Registered Member

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    I have 1 gigabyte of Ram.
     
  9. FBMachines

    FBMachines Registered Member

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    While not ideal, that should work OK for you. I would set the XP VM to use anywhere from 128 - 256MB (you might need to play around with this to get the most out of Vista). If you aren't sure what that means, when you create a new VM it will ask you how much of the system RAM you want to allocate for the VM to use.

    Corey
     
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