I solved the CPU problem I've had with NOD32

Discussion in 'ESET NOD32 Antivirus' started by cdysthe, Jul 13, 2008.

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  1. cdysthe

    cdysthe Registered Member

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    Hi,

    I have had serious problems with NOD32 3's CPU usage. The ekrn.exe process has been eating CPU like there's no tomorrow to the extent I have had to kill it (it starts again right away though).

    I've been trying to find out what could be wrong and came up with a "cure" which works for me: I've disabled indexing and volume shadow copy in Windows Vista. With disabled I mean I have stopped the services and disabled them. After that the CPU problem has gone away. I do not use Windows search and not system restore and Windows backup either which both needs shadow copy. So for me this is an acceptable solution, on top of which getting rid of two more services in Windows represents a performance boost in itself.

    I just wanted to post it here since I've seen others on this forum with the same problem. It was really bad and made it impossible for me to work efficiently. Now I'm back on track :)
     
  2. The Hammer

    The Hammer Registered Member

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    I'll keep this in mind if I ever get Vista.
     
  3. The Nodder

    The Nodder Registered Member

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    From the day I got Vista I disable those two items and I have not had any problems, I often wondered what all the fuss was about with ekrn, now I know.
    thanks for the info.
     
  4. SmackyTheFrog

    SmackyTheFrog Registered Member

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    The volume shadow copy is a service that can be called upon by other programs and disabling it could break some functionality and disabling indexing will neuter your quicksearch bar. It would be far more productive to look in the Resource Monitor and monitor the hard disk or network activity as it is likely that other programs running in memory are calling on those two services and causing the real-time protection modules to overload your CPU, rather than an actual issue with the service itself.
     
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