How to protect from your ISP

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by flyted, Jun 24, 2011.

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  1. flyted

    flyted Registered Member

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    Seems to be a big loophole in privacy in that they all keep data for some time now right? Any way to protect your browsing from your ISP or will they always see what you do. All I use is Tor.
     
  2. cm1971

    cm1971 Registered Member

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    It depends on the ISP. I have read that they keep information anywhere from 6 months to many years. Some may even keep it indefinitely.
     
  3. Spooony

    Spooony Registered Member

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    Get another ISP. Your using their network. You agree to their terms. Yes they keep your records not what you downloaded but connections made and with phone calls especially with cell networks the towers your mobile device with its imei and what sim is in it etc etc. They can see what hardware are they're users running on the network. Some are just plain evil by dpi and injecting all sorts of junk into the network traffic. So basically you can't hide from them. If your not satisfied you have free will and a choice get another ISP

    Here are a list of what type of eyes they got on their network
    http://wiki.vuze.com/w/Bad_ISPs
     
  4. flyted

    flyted Registered Member

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    I've seen the statement made here that privacy does not exist on the internet. If your ISP sees everything you do, it then makes no difference what security program you have as its available to the ISP and seems like most will give it to whoever asks almost. Youtube has a bunch of videos on industry experts saying there are basically no reliable ISP's as many now have big gov't contracts and want to please each and evry local state and federal agency who wants info on anyone as they might be business for them in the future. Seems privacy is over when your ISP back-doors you.
     
  5. Spooony

    Spooony Registered Member

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    Google does most of that. The authorities just subhoena Google. ISPs is too much effort

    They normally assign a Ip to your mac addy or imei. So theres no hiding from them
     
  6. Kendo

    Kendo Registered Member

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    Dunno what you are worried about. I used to be an ISP and we didn't intentionally monitor user activity except to ensure that you were eligible to access our network and the services that we provided. A network needs to be protected which in turn protects users from a lot more than what they need to worry about.

    If you don't like the seating arrangement you can always get off and walk.
     
  7. x942

    x942 Guest

    The worst I have seen is Rogers in canada. They are pushing to inject ads into your web content. Glad I don't use them. That said use a VPN to hide your traffic from your ISP. DPI Can't magically crack a VPN (if it uses good encryption). DPI is just a "legit" MITM attack. If they can't MITM you (A good VPN is secure against this) than you are safe. Also you HAVE to trust someone eventually. Until every page on the net is 100% SSL with AES-256 bit encryption SOMEONE WILL be able to see what you are doing. Unless you use End-to-End encryption + TOR someone will no what you are doing and who you are connecting to. TOR fixes this as all the ISP sees is you connecting to TOR and all the end sees is TOR.

    Easy? No. Possible? Yes. Worried? No. Anything I'd do that needs to be secure is done via VPNs + TOR.
     
  8. Spooony

    Spooony Registered Member

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  9. x942

    x942 Guest

  10. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    It is 100% true. Neither TCP, UDP or IP require or support any form of encryption. If you want privacy, you need to encrypt your data at a higher level.

    That is a big IF. An ISP can see everything you do, but that doesn't mean that it will do it. Most of the time, you don't have too much to worry about.
     
  11. flyted

    flyted Registered Member

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    When you are just browsing and a website lists your IP address somewhere in the corner of a page, we're now a little past the point where they track you for statistical data, they're telling you they are watching. Legit sites, no downloading of music or any of the hot stuff. You don't have to be a conspiracy theorist to realize privacy is on the way out. Does technology automatically mean no privacy? If someone buys a device to listen through the wall of your home, does it mean its ok just because it can be done? Its stupid to say move on when the internet is here to stay and I think reasonable privacy is still reasonable to expect.
     
  12. Spooony

    Spooony Registered Member

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    that is the most awful thing they can do. I like to ask them in a civil court when I'm riding their behind for a huge claim.
    Are the P2P protocol illegal?
    Do the traffic from a person playing WOW and a person using a torrent look different?

    Games use P2P aswell. So they will assume your pirating.
    There was some thing years ago where they wanted to force the isps to sent out warning letters to those using P2P.
    Most networks object against it because that's how they make their money. But some isps went ahead and tried it and you can imagine which were the isps who went and done it. They're tied to other network corporations in the broadcasting business etc.
    A lot of the isps are in it to make something in the end of the day. Theres a lot of competition and they want to keep they're customers and improve their marketshare.
    Personally I will check to who the isp belongs to and who are they affiliated with. If Mr Murdoch and co got a hand in the pie RUN!
     
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