How Big is Your Haystack?

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by Cudni, Jun 9, 2012.

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  1. Cudni

    Cudni Global Moderator

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    from
    https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm
    "..
    This interactive brute force search space calculator allows you to experiment with password length and composition to develop an accurate and quantified sense for the safety of using passwords that can only be found through exhaustive search. Please see the discussion below for additional information.
    .."

    interesting and fun
     
  2. Janus

    Janus Registered Member

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  3. moontan

    moontan Registered Member

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    tnx for the heads-up.
    this comes just in times because i have been thinking about this stuff lately.

    it shows that a password can be both very secure and easy to remember at the same times.

    truly, it would seem that it's not only the size of your haystack that matters but how you use it as well! :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  4. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    I've been thinking about a little re-implementation of my password arrangement too, mainly how to make it more convenient to use.

    Going by the results that page shows for massive cracking array scenario, one of my standard, easy to remember phrases would require
    14.67 trillion centuries to crack, so I guess changing the setup isn't too urgent.

    A random cut and paste from one of my "source files" would require 3.36 thousand trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion centuries.

    Too bad it can't accept multiple lines for pass phrases. I would have been interested to see what crazy number it came up with for one of my encrypted partitions.
     
  5. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    The password 'strength' thing on there isn't meant to be accurate, really. As they say the d0g password is the harder one to crack but it loses points because of "entropy" on any password meter.
     
  6. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    I've been using "visual" ways to remember passwords.
    What I do is imagine a pattern on a keyboard. Say every second key in the first row, every third in a second, then repeat first row with Shift. Or a checkers, or a rectangle, diagonal lines pattern, there are many possibilities. That way I can use very complex passwords without actually having to remember them.
     
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