Having no facebook can make you suspect?

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by x942, Aug 15, 2012.

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  1. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    That "need" to be connected all of the time is incomprehensible to me as well. In this world, simple peace and quiet can be hard to find. I value it and enjoy it whenever I can. Others I know can't stand it. They absolutely hate it if there isn't some kind of electronic noise filling the air. In a lot of ways, we're becoming like the Borg on Star Trek.

    High school is a pretty good description of it. "He said that she said..." Global gossip center where sounding and acting like a teenager is acceptable behavior for adults. IMO, that's the biggest thing this "connected" world is doing, turning adults back into children with big brother the self appointed babysitter.
     
  2. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    It is hardly surprising that older people don't understand younger people. This has been the case for generations.
     
  3. philby

    philby Registered Member

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    Me neither... so breakfast was a banana...and some human flesh o_O
     
  4. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    You are right. One day you'll also learn that years add wisdom and those older people may have been right. That, too, has been the case for generations.
     
  5. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    By the time many of the younger generation realize that those who are older might have been right, they themselves are part of an older generation and the cycle is already repeating. That aside, technology and "being connected" have widened the gap between the generations a lot. AFAICT, what's changing the most are the things each values. For me, My Space is my home, my yard, the wildlife I share it with, etc, not a website that's the equivalent of a public diary.
     
  6. Dundertaker

    Dundertaker Registered Member

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    Judging people without a Facebook account as "suspicious" is stupid. There are a lot of good honest people without Facebook accounts. It is that "big brother" attitude that needs to be corrected and controlled. Not "them" wanting to control "us" (-- or better yet all people). That staying connected idea is okay but the need to stay connected does not mean being connected always with "big brother Facebook".

    I don't see the need for a person to be pushed to have his life and interest be an "open book" to everyone. Choosing not to have a Facebook account is a privacy thing. I have lots of friends who are now thinking that they should not have posted pictures and some profile privacy things they have ought to kept private but now they cannot do anything because its there and Facebook now owns it. True that Facebook has it's uses but there have been a lot of deception on how Facebook handles sensitive information like the ones they give to advertisers etc..This is all about having control of our lives. Yeah they say they help us to make our lives more easier, (it started as a university-school project with good purpose ---then later turned into a surveillance tool etc).
    Even cops are into Facebook looking for suspects and not doing real copwork. Those who wanna be connected "always" never really do anything but reveal more and more information for big brother to ingest for their advertisers and their sponsor-surveillance-friend. Some who had been victims of fraud including the lowly malware they got took the bitter pill. Those who are savvy say, we are young and this in the "in" thing now. In the end, like it or not / accept it or not...control is the word here.

    Do want to be controlled by "big brother Facebook"...?
     
  7. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    In youth we feel richer for every new illusion; in maturer years, for every one we lose. ;)
     
  8. twl845

    twl845 Registered Member

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    I understand them alright, I just can't convince them that they're making a mistake until after they make it.
     
  9. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    Why try convincing them?
    It's more entertaining to let them be and see them learn it on their own.
     
  10. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    Right up until their individual and/or collective decisions affect you!
     
  11. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    Ah, very good point.
    And to stay on topic, FB obsession can affect us all, say for example, in the workplace. Fortunately, many businesses have blocked employee access to FB on company computers.
     
  12. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    I think you understand what I meant :) To be fair as well as more accurate, I'd suggest we broaden things a bit. The real problem, I think, is unsophisticated or otherwise not very demanding users *regardless* of age. Facebook offers some desirable features but implements things in a monstrous way. It has pulled off a tremendous coup by capturing in unencrypted form a massive amount of inherently private communications and information between a large percentage of the world's (online) population. That should NEVER have happened, and it isn't Facebook's fault that it did.

    <V>
    How did this happen? Who's to blame? Well certainly there are those who are more responsible than others... but again, truth be told, if you're looking for the guilty, you need only look into a mirror.

    I know why you did it. I know you were intrigued. Who wouldn't be? Easy, convenient, free of charge. There were a myriad of things which conspired to corrupt your reason and rob you of your common sense. Desire got the best of you and in your haste, you turned to Facebook. It promised you order. It promised you convenience. And all it demanded in return was your silent, obedient consent.
    </V>
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2012
  13. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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    I have a Facebook account, and I registered for my own reasons, but I do not use it. Does that make me suspicious? ;)
     
  14. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Youth is wasted on the young. - George Bernard Shaw


    I'd probably had been better off if up until I was 25 I reversed all my decisions. :,
     
  15. Cudni

    Cudni Global Moderator

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    ot posts removed
     
  16. hidden

    hidden Registered Member

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    If you really want to feel the pressure...

    sometime when sitting around with folks you know, start talking about how they gave permission for FB to sell their image and endorsement to third parties whenever they 'like' (no money for the member). EU-required FB responses to member information requests run thousand+ pages. Fb facial recognition and deep personal network technology. Unexpected privacy remixes. Etcetc, you know the drill.

    This is where self-enforcement of social norms meets the road. Annoyance; unease; growing anger at YOU; "I NEED my FB!"; "I don't want to think about that stuff!" Absolutely no concept that connecting might be/have been different.

    This is not a thought experiment; try it for yourself. On the rare occasion when people allow themselves a glimpse of the implications, the person shining the light becomes the aim point.

    Facebook is a dynamic, important, extremely dangerous social movement, and we are gratefully doing it to ourselves.
     
  17. EncryptedBytes

    EncryptedBytes Registered Member

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    I would argue it is not just social media that is trying to interconnect, but many online mediums as a whole. The result is OSINT has become leaps and bounds easier to pull off and not just for government, but anyone who wants to target an individual as more information is piped through single internet bottle necks such as Google, Facebook, Twitter.

    I can say with 85% confidence many members on this site are also vulnerable to OSINT even though you have sound security principles and practices for your computers, in terms of privacy you are wide open. Maybe you reused your user handle here on another site and your other account has PII, or hints of your interests/hobbies that leads to another site and another and another until I have your real name, interests, physical address, friends, family, etc. While all that information was originally scattered it can now easily be connected. Maybe you have a unique writing style that I can profile through your posting history to track down your blog,twitter, youtube, facebook. All this is easy with the advancements of SE algorithms and social media hang outs.
     
  18. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    +100 on this. "Cleaning Up" your past activity online, should be job #1. Unless you do this from the outset, there are links, like EB stated. I'm guilty of this myself due to getting online in the early 90's (although I have been successful at sanitizing 99% of it). Who thought in 1995, that we would need VPNs and a different name for each site? Excellent post!

    PD
     
  19. EncryptedBytes

    EncryptedBytes Registered Member

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    I am more of a fan of counter intelligence, I do not mind giving people privacy advice but take it from your friendly Wilders member in the know; in 2012 privacy for better, for worse, is pretty much squashed at least until the laws change with the times. Your identity is out there, you can mitigate to a degree what entities see it, but it is captured. The best you can do is keep your activities compartmentalized as much as possible and pick up different personas to achieve different tasks and objectives. I’ve chosen the name EB due to the many other EB names out there but kept it relevant to this website, I try to choose names which are unique but also commonly used.
     
  20. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    To a degree I'm guilty of this too. I did use the same username at a lot of sites. None of them were "social sites" like Facebook or twitter, and none of them contained or linked to any real data about me. That said, I didn't bother to hide my real IP for a long time and have experienced real world repercussions for some of the material I've posted over the years. I'm not sure there's much point in my trying to be anonymous now.

    Depending on your activities and the reasons behind them, I question if concealing your identity is counter-productive. Anonymous opposition to censorship that is touted as "anti child porn" for example tends to be twisted to mean that you support it.
     
  21. guest

    guest Guest

    "Potentially hostile wildlife having free run of the property"

    Well I always wanted a gorilla as a butler and let him
    answer the door when nosy people come around,
    bet they won't give him any @#%o_O o_O o_O
     
  22. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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  23. safeguy

    safeguy Registered Member

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    What's next? Having no Google or Microsoft account makes one a suspect?
    For goodness sake, there's a limit to being lame. AFAIAC, this one just crosses the line.
     
  24. Ianb

    Ianb Registered Member

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    Reminded me of "I do wish we could chat longer, but... I'm having an old friend for dinner. Bye Clarice" :D
     
  25. new2security

    new2security Registered Member

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    Facebook - no.
    Twitter - yeah.
     
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