Hard drives can survive fire, floods

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by ronjor, Sep 12, 2007.

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  1. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Story
     
  2. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    Tapes are even more resilient, now getting a good drive cheaply is not easy, so I am envious of anyone who has one for backup, but my external usb will have to do for now :D Actually someone whom I know had a massive emergency when one of there "secured" vaults with incredibly thick walls at a remote site had a small paper fire somehow, so the fire department without authorization drilled a hole into the vault and flooded it, along with all the tape drives that were backups and some only copies of terabytes of data worth millions of dollars :blink: . Most of the important data was recovered at a very very expensive price, so its recoverable, but the cost is another factor.

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  3. ccsito

    ccsito Registered Member

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    I attended a computer expo and DriveSavers had a booth that displayed hard drives that were burned, soaked, battered, etc and which they could still recover the data. :ninja:
     
  4. [suave]

    [suave] Registered Member

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    This is one of the reasons why I'm considering using one of those online backup services.
     
  5. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    I don't doubt that for a second. Hard Drives are sealed pretty tight. I only peeled a couple of them only because they malfunctioned to a point where even the BIOS couldn't read them. Those tiny screws are likely TORQUED and the seal seemed fairly conjoined firmly.

    As long as the exposed circuitry branch on their underbelly hasn't been bluntly affected or broken, their pretty darn resilient.
     
  6. lucas1985

    lucas1985 Retired Moderator

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    The key word is redundancy. External drives, CDs/DVDs, offsite storage, online storage, dedicated storage companies (example) ;)
     
  7. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Fort Knox is a possible to keep your backup media safe. :)
     
  8. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    Backup storage methods i use.

    Hard Drives (of course)
    DVD/CD (plastics, yuck!)
    Iomega Zip Drive (obsolete, but whatever) (really just a large floppy diskette)
    USB Pen (Another of my personal favorites)
    External Drives = Hard Disks ( I have none yet)

    METAL is the safest followed by Pen Circuitry i would think.

    I haven't discovered the method to keep backups on VHS Tapes yet. :D

    I might one day construct some concrete with wrought iron, lined with lead for radioactive protection home-made safe but then buying a residential fireproof safe would likely be more simpler.
     
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