FD-ISR (1st Time user)

Discussion in 'FirstDefense-ISR Forum' started by Ptah, Apr 22, 2006.

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  1. Ptah

    Ptah Registered Member

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    What advise would you give to any first time users and what are programs strong and weak points?

    Thanks,

    Ptah

    PS: I hate being a newbie!:)
     
  2. Acadia

    Acadia Registered Member

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    The only weak point that I am aware of is the MBR. When you install FD, it gives you the option to save a copy of the MBR to floppy -- do it! I've never needed it, but I make a copy of the MBR using the FirstDefense Menu option to do just that about every six months. Otherwise ... ENJOY!! :cool:

    Acadia
     
  3. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    1. RTFM and the knowledge base, which is absolutely necessary with this type of software. :)
    2. Separate your Operating System from your personal files.
    3. Take care of your IMAGE BACKUP/RESTORE first.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2006
  4. Acadia

    Acadia Registered Member

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    Erik is absolutely correct, read, read, read. I had to read the manual, KB, and FAQ, a couple of times before I fully, well, fairly enough, understood this powerful program and all of it's flexibility.

    Acadia
     
  5. Ptah

    Ptah Registered Member

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    I just wanted to add the manual seems abit small for this program type. I recently trialed Rollback it has a 112 page manual. If I am wrong about FD please point me in the right direction for the full manual download.

    How do you seperate your OS if the system only has one partition C:?
     
  6. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I assume you have only ONE physical harddisk which means you have to create two partitions "C:" and "D:" on your harddisk.
    C: = system partition : Windows + Programs
    D: = personal partition : all the files you created yourself or downloaded from the internet.

    I don't have any practical experience with this separation, but other members have. I only know that it is possible and absolutely necessary IMO.
    So I have to experiment myself, once I have my new computer.
    Tools like TweakUI and Folder Mover are created for this purpose.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2006
  7. Acadia

    Acadia Registered Member

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  8. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Ptah

    So you don't necessarily get carried away, be aware that Erik hasn't actually done any of what he is talking about, and it is totally unnecessary to partition your disk JUST because you are adding FDISR.

    FDISR has a feature called data anchoring, so for example if you keep your data in your My Documents folder you can data anchor it. That way the same data will be available to all snapshots.

    When I use FDISR on disk, I use data anchoring so each snapshot can share the same data. WHen I archive a snapshot to an external drive, which is more for backup type purposes, then I don't use data anchoring.

    Read the documentation, ask questions, and then you will be able to figure out the best options.

    Pete
     
  9. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    There are two important senses in which and reasons for separating your personal data (MY meaning is your "My Documents" folder) from your operating system.

    1) If your personal data MUST remain on your C: drive, then you are much better off to "anchor" your personal data from FD-ISR, i.e., exclude it from the snapshots you make. See "Tools/Data Anchoring" on the FD-ISR menu and the topic "What is Data Anchoring ?" in FD-ISR's Help. For one thing, it will greatly reduce the storage requirements for operating system snapshots. Secondly, if you wish to operate from different snapshots at different times, all of your personoal data would then be updated INDEPENDENTLY of which snapshot you're operating in.

    2) From a data security and integrity standpoint, you are better off storing the data on a separate physical hard drive, or at the very least, moving it off into a separate partition. That way your personal data can be backed up multiple times without having to backup your operating system (although it wouldn't be a bad idea to back up the OS to a separate location or drive, either -- you can also Archive your operating system to another drive from within FD-ISR).

    The actual movement of your "My Documents" folder to another partition or physical drive can be as simple as right clicking on the folder (the special one at the TOP of the folder window) in Windows Explorer OR on the special shortcut that may be on your desktop, selecting "Properties", and then changing the "Target Folder Location" to the path you want. Windows will take care of the rest.

    If I were you, I'd consider all of the rest of the folders under Documents and Settings on your system partition to be parts of the operating system and leave them alone.

    If you haven't committed to a particular imaging backup solution yet, you may want to consider Terabyte Unlimited's "BootIt NG". With that, in addition to getting a very effective and reliable imaging backup, you get the capability to create and move around as many partitions on your physical drive as most people would care to. BootIt NG operations are performed within a separately Booted GUI environment. An alternative would be to get BootItNG PLUS Terabyte's "Image for Windows" to backup data from within Windows and with a free "open" files add-on to do a live backup of the OS or other locked files).

    ETA: Sorry for the duplication of some of what Peter2150 said but we posted near the same time. At least us more experienced users seem to talking along the same lines.;) And I agree with Pete in that you don't HAVE to separate your data from the OS physically if you have an adequate backup practice in place, although breaking up into separate partitions CAN simplify data backup, defragging, and other maintenance activities for you, depending on the size of the partitions.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2006
  10. Ptah

    Ptah Registered Member

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    Thanks Acadia for the link I knew there must be more information.

    My current HD is 149gb with 20+ of OS and applications and another 20+ is my secondary snapshot. I have all of my program .exe backup on a cd with private data also truecrpyt for everyday private date on hand. I also keep a hard copy of all user/password info. just incase system pc must be rebuilt from scratch. I currently do not have any imaging software but I need to get my head around FD then PD and finally Imaging in that order providing my head does not explode from information OVERLOAD!o_O

    The best thing I did was join this forum the information has been very valuable and everyone is always willing to help!!

    PS.: On the imaging side of things what should I look for, I see alot of people here use ATI. I just concerned about learning curve and program compatibilty.

    Thanks,

    Ptah
     
  11. Acadia

    Acadia Registered Member

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    Ptah, your welcome. I know a "fair" amount about FirstDefense but when it comes to imaging, listen to Peter and the others, they know much more than I do about that stuff, take care. :)

    Acadia
     
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