FCC Rules Against Comcast P-to-P Throttling

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by dw426, Aug 1, 2008.

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  1. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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  2. ccsito

    ccsito Registered Member

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    That offer high bandwidth, but don't want you to actually use it. :D ;)
     
  3. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Lol, you know it :D
     
  4. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    This is an important step for Internet democracy.
    I'm pleased.
    Mrk
     
  5. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    I'm pleased too, for the moment. There's always a chance that this "openess" could backfire. I don't mean that in a 'secretive ISP plot" sort of way, what I mean is, and hopefully someone more knowledgeable with networks can help me out here, is it possible that we could see major slowdowns overall due to not throttling coupled with the massive amount of bandwidth that internet (legal too) media eats up now and is expected to eat up even more in the near future?

    If an ISP does not have major funding behind it and/or the will to upgrade their ability to handle all this bandwidth, are we actually going backward instead of forward?
     
  6. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    If they give you 1Mbps, then you're entitled to it 24/7. It's not the user's fault that the ISP expect them, on average to utilize only 1% of their bandwidth. The same goes with infinite mail and such.

    They give away supposedly big packages, but can't support them. And when users actually take them up on their word, they start complaining about costs and bandwidth ...

    Meaning = they never intended to meet their end of the bargain, and effectively, users are paying 50-100 more per bit of data than they're supposed to.

    You get X bandwidth, you're free use it to the max. You paid for it!

    Mrk
     
  7. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    I guess eventually that "unlimited access" will be a thing of the past and they will start charging a set fee for usage over a set monthly limit. It's either that or all ISPs undergo major upgrades to their infrastructure, which many will kick, scream, and claw until actually forced to do so by federal order. I just don't see the validity in their argument that they are suffering from so called "bandwidth hogging" unless they were ill-prepared to deal with it to start with.
     
  8. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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  9. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Good grief, I've got a 20Mbps line here for 40 a month. Back on topic though, this is what's coming to an ISP near you. People will be going over that 40Gb cap in nothing flat, you don't even have to try to go over it on today's web.
     
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