Factory overclocked graphics cards, a few questions...

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Zapco_force, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. Zapco_force

    Zapco_force Registered Member

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    Hello everyone, I have a question for the experts about overclocked graphics cards.
    In fact, I observed that graphics card manufacturers have the "defect" to overclock by default .... but I don't need high-performance (I'm not a gamer!) and so I prefer to limit consumption.
    So I want to know the consumption of factory-overclocked Gpu, than the standard?
    For example the standard frequencies of nVidia GTX750 are 1020Mhz and 1085Mhz (with boost) whereas the model Gigabyte GV-N750OC (that interesting to me) has frequencies of 1058Mhz and 1159Mhz with boost....Therefore, someone can tell me the TDP value of the Gigabyte GV-N750OC card??...certainly cannot be 55W as the standard Gpu, right?

    One last thing: it is also true that the amount of VRAM affects enough the Gpu consumption?
     
  2. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    Yes, the factory overclocked card will use a tad bit more power. The card will only be clocked higher, it won't be able to apply more voltage than the stock card. If you're really concerned about it, you have a few options. The first would be to just get a card that has the same clocks as default. The second option would be to use MSI Afterburner to either set the TDP target lower or underclock and undervolt the card. This would work for any card you get. The third option would be to flash a modified bios to manually set the clock speed and max voltage back to default, or whatever you desire.

    If you're not a gamer then you could get away with the gpu integrated into your cpu, assuming you have one. Another option would be to step down to the Nvidia GT line.

    As for vram, I don't see how having more would have much of an impact on power consumption, if at all. Additionally, if you're not a gamer, I wouldn't stress over how much vram you get.
     
  3. Zapco_force

    Zapco_force Registered Member

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    Thanks CrusherW9 for the reply.
    I expected that the factory overclocked cards have higher consumption.....but the problem is figuring how much more!!
    As I said I'm not a gamer, but I need nVidia dedicated graphics card to exploit her CUDA-cores for another operations like editing video,
    audio-video encoding, rendering, etc
    Again considering the example of Gigabyte GV-N750OC that is overclocked by default to 1058 and 1159mhz (instead 1020 and 1085Mhz) what
    will be its real TDP valueo_O.....10% more, 20% more, or....?
     
  4. Keatah

    Keatah Registered Member

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    The simplist solution is to not worry about it and buy something non-overclocked. Overclocked things are always less stable than their regular speed counterparts. And the amount of gain is minimal at best.

    It is difficult to calculate the exact power usage increase due to different timings, efficiencies of code, and semiconductor non-linearities.
     
  5. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    "Overclocked things are always less stable than their regular speed counterparts. And the amount of gain is minimal at best."

    I'm going to go ahead and say that that isn't true at all. You can see large gains with an overclock AND be completely stable. As for knowing the exact TDP, like Keatah said, it'd be difficult to calculate.
     
  6. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    It's not that simple because the VRM circuitry and cooling system also contribute to the power consumption of the graphics card, and this will vary between vendor and model. The only semi-reliable way (that does not involve electrical test equipment) is to follow what is mentioned on the box for power requirements.
     
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