Facebook Wants to Listen to Your Phone Calls +

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by CloneRanger, Nov 27, 2013.

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  1. CloneRanger

    CloneRanger Registered Member

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    If it wasn't true, i would have thought it was a bad joke ! Amazingly, i'm guessing that Most people will allow these privacy intrusions o_O Being mentally ill is the new black !
     
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    That is crazy :eek:

    I'm guessing that it's paranoid lawyer language at its worst. They're covering their ... in case something gets recorded accidently.

    But whatever, I keep my phone in a padded Faraday bag ;)
     
  3. cb474

    cb474 Registered Member

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    I think starting with 4.3 Android has a privacy feature that lets you selectively disable permissions like this. Called AppOps. But it may not be enabled by default and you might need a third party app to use it. Cyanogenmod and other ROMs also have privacy guard features. In ParanoidAndroid, in the settings, you can just go into a specific app, see a checklist of what it can do on the phone, and uncheck things. Whenever I install a new app, I'm always disabling all kinds of things. The other thing that I think is a must have feature on a smartphone (although this would not apply to Facebook) is a firewall that lets you determine which apps can connect to the internet. My scientific calculator and Angry Birds, for that matter, just don't need network access ever, as far as I'm concerned. Easy to do on rooted Android phones (with, say AFWall+).

    Probably the Facebook app, if I had to guess, plans to use some kind of voice activated features. You commonly see permissions for microphone access in all kinds of apps that do voice features in various ways. In fact, I think most people would be surprised about the sort of permissions many apps get as default, which might seem to have nothing to do with their functionality (like say a traffic app accessing your contact list). And, as mirimir said, it sounds like the Facebook lawyers got overzealous in their wording.

    I don't know if iOS will let you disable things like this. But anyway, the trend is toward voice activation for everything. Like the Moto X phone. It's always listening, even when it's "off." Than functionality is built into the new Snapdragon processors. ;)
     
  4. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    Xposed Framework and XPrivacy are a good control tool as well (Rooted Android).
     
  5. FreddyFreeloader

    FreddyFreeloader Registered Member

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    Looks like it's a phone tap.
     
  6. guest

    guest Guest

    When the border of malware and "normal" apps is completely gone, things will get even more fun! :argh:

    Lol, not even NSA will go down that far. Any info if there's any other social networking or other apps which do this kind of "game" as well?
     
  7. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    o_O

    It's clear that they already do, no?
     
  8. siljaline

    siljaline Former Poster

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    Nothing new here as your Google based Android phone is open license to gather all your data.

    -http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7sVn6aRm49k-

    Investigating Android permissions
    http://www.net-security.org/article.php?id=1734
     
  9. Wroll

    Wroll Registered Member

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    They profit because nobody reads that crap and to be honest you can't really blame people for that. If you read every EULA on every software you have on your PC/gadget you'd get old and still have half unread.
     
  10. Reality

    Reality Registered Member

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    The only danger about Facebook is that people will get used to hearing how bad it is, thus the saying, familiarity breeds contempt. :(
    LOL ...Graf where have you been hiding that head of yours? :blink:
     
  11. siljaline

    siljaline Former Poster

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    EULA's are not quite the issue in this case, it is the up-front app privacy policy that were listed in app *stores* such as Google Play and Apple's iTunes, as examples. There was a time when the app had a fully disclosed list of privacy requirements. These are now deferred to the originating site privacy policy which often is deceptive and misleading. This results in more apps being used with less users being aware of how their data by said app is being metered by the device and by the creators of the app.

     
  12. siljaline

    siljaline Former Poster

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    For those that have Google Play accounts, F-Secure has an app that requires no permissions to run - not even Network Access. Will fully list the permissions all of your installed apps require to run. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.fsecure.app.permissions.privacy&hl=en

    If your concern is if the app contains third party bundled advertising that is not disclosed, you might want to keep it at the handy.
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lookout.addetector

    No product plugs intended or implied.
     
  13. SnowFlakes

    SnowFlakes Registered Member

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    Let 'em listen ;) who cares. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Reality

    Reality Registered Member

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    Those who arent suckers :rolleyes:
     
  15. aladdin

    aladdin Registered Member

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    Every App you put on your smart phone, listen to you and messy up your privacy. There is no way to stop the App, even one has a rooted phone. EULA and/or up-front app privacy policy doesn't matter as every App you install does the same, even paid ones.

    The root of the problem is source, the Google, Apple and Windows Stores.

    Best regards,

    Mohamed
     
  16. Reality

    Reality Registered Member

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    Exactly. Somethings require a hard decision, where you cant have your cake and eat it too. If you care enough about your privacy, you'll ditch your smart phone.
    and who owns those stores? Google Apple and Windows, so theyre the source of the problem.
     
  17. aladdin

    aladdin Registered Member

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    Hi REALITY,

    Welcome to FEED. Very soon we will all have a chip implanted in our body (brain) and connected to each other much, much more than a smart phone. You will be one of those HACKER who wants to destroy FEED, by creating VIRUS to FEED, by becoming a Terrorist. Just kidding! :)

    Enjoy FEED:

    http://www.amazon.com/Feed-M-T-Anderson/dp/0763662623

    FEED is not FAR!

    Mohamed
     
  18. RollingThunder

    RollingThunder Registered Member

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    Mirimir, you are forgetting how anti privacy Marc Zuckerberg is. I do not believe for a second that it is to cover their collective you know whats.

     
  19. ComputerSaysNo

    ComputerSaysNo Registered Member

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    Grab for cash is all i'll say!
     
  20. Reality

    Reality Registered Member

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    Really? :D .... whatever, youve gone a bit OT but FWIW you wont be kidding when you break out in sores for taking the chip implant. o_O

    As for me I'll pass on smart phones, smart TV smart et al AND chip implants. :thumb:
     
  21. RollingThunder

    RollingThunder Registered Member

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    One problem with passing on smart phones is they are so darn useful. However, the ability of the government and corporations to track cannot be ignored. At least with old style phones you just removed the battery and the powers that be were done. I am thinking about getting a smart phone. i don't know how to strike a balance between technology and privacy/security. There may not be a way.

     
  22. guest

    guest Guest

    First, NSA doesn't hijack people's mobile gadgets by making an app available for download. They only watch over us in the level that I call as "the outer line". Second, NSA mines and stores your data for the sake of national security while Facebook did this to gain commercial profits. As long as you're not an important individual, internet surveillance done by the government will protect the people from irresponsible and illegal activities by some versions of the so-called anonymous communities. Third, NSA collects those data to store them in case they need some information about those who they consider as threats. Facebook (and Google I'll have to admit) collects them with the purpose not other than to leak it so they can get some profits while making you all as their voluntary pawns. So no, I disagree with you.

    Definitely not behind the Guido's face mask, that's for sure. ;)
     
  23. Snoop3

    Snoop3 Registered Member

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    unfortunately we'll find out later that the NSA (and their puppeteers in the gov't) consider many more people as "threats" than the average reasonable person would.
     
  24. guest

    guest Guest

    Now don't think too far of it. That's not going to be that bad, at least not in the United States.
     
  25. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    It already is that bad, based on what I've read via Wilders. NSA shares data with FBI and DEA. They tip off prosecutors, and coach them on parallel construction. That process, on its face, is illegal in the US.
     
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