Evernote vs Onenote from a privacy perspective?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by Rigz, Jun 28, 2015.

  1. Rigz

    Rigz Registered Member

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    I know neither is a great idea being cloud based, but do either keep stored information encrypted? I noticed with Evernote there is an option to encrypt selected text and with Onenote there is an option to password protect notes. Does anyone know what type of encryption Evernote uses or if Onenote encrypts password protected notes or simply just requires an additional password to access them?

    Does anyone have any experience using Getsaferoom.com integration with either Evernote or Onenote?
     
  2. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    OneNote can keep notebooks locally or in the cloud. Unless I've missed something, it is not able to encrypt cloud-based notebooks, whereas it can do so for local notebooks. Details of this encryption are hard to come by, but what I saw was that it was "normal" office document encryption with AES-256. The whole notebook section is encrypted, including any associated pictures etc.

    I'm not happy with either Evernote or OneNote in terms of their ability to encrypt information and have it searchable, so I'm looking for alternative ways of doing this. My ideal is for granular encryption with TFA, coupled with an encrypted search index.
     
  3. Rigz

    Rigz Registered Member

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    Just following up on an old thread that I started...

    I've come to the conclusion that there really isn't any need for a dedicated "note taking app" (in my life).

    My current solution is to create a "notes" directory (or whatever you want to call it), and inside have subdirectories which serve as individual "notebooks." I use a text editor or word processor and save the notes in a cross platform format (remember how we all use to organize our files pre-cloud... it worked just fine). If I need to "clip" a webpage I just use the Print to PDF feature. If the information is so important that I need constant mobile access I can sync it with SpiderOak, Sync.com, Mega, OwnCloud, or any of the other countless hosted services that either claim zero-knowledge, or that I can host on my own server.

    My computer's local drive is already encrypted and so is my mobile device.

    We don't need OneNote, Evernote, etc.
     
  4. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    I actually value OneNote quite a lot and would not be as happy with the ad-hoc scheme you outline - horses for courses, naturally.

    OneNote already does synchronisation so that you have it with you (on PCs), so you do not have to rely on putting the information on the cloud. For the 2010 version, I can sandbox it and prevent it talking to the cloud, but I'm unhappy with the way it's going from that point of view - I want apps that are either internet facing but do not get much access to local storage, or vice versa - not both; which is the way OneNote 2013 is going.

    In a world of infinite time, I do plot writing my own office suite that actually does some innovative stuff - the progress with the office suites has been glacial - for example, I cannot for the life of me understand why one doesn't get the ability to have tabbed Word documents (which would help with the scheme you refer to)
     
  5. ace2564

    ace2564 Registered Member

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    I would go for evernote. It comes down to which corporation you trust more from selling your personal information.
     
  6. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    well, evernote's had its "moments" from a security pov, and it's intrinsically cloud based which onenote is not, necessarily.... plus I don't actually allow onenote network access unless I want a cloud notebook (which is not for very much). Of course, there's the wider issue of the OS, but that's another can 'o worms.

    I don't really trust either tbh, but that's part of the tainted world we live in. But then, I think I'm going to write my own software for the purpose.
     
  7. Rigz

    Rigz Registered Member

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    After doing a bit of research....

    Evernote's encryption implementation is 128 bit AES and only allows users to encrypt excerpts of text inside of a note instead of encrypting the entire note meaning that only the highlighted text is encrypted. Images, and whatever else may be in the note are not able to be encrypted. 

If you're going to go this route and use Evernote's servers instead of local notebooks I would suggest turning the auto sync function off, and only allowing your notebooks to be manually synced by using the sync button. This ensures that the sync will only happen after you've encrypted the text.

    https://help.evernote.com/hc/en-us/articles/208314128-What-type-of-encryption-does-Evernote-use-


    
OneNote 2016 uses 128bit AES for encrypting notebook "sections" (this is for the Mac version which is most relevant for me).

    Microsoft's statement on using OneNote 2016 for Mac with 128 bit AES is...

    
“OneNote for Mac uses 128-bit AES encryption to secure password-protected notebook sections. If you forget your password, no one will be able to unlock your notes for you — not even Microsoft Technical Support.”

    
but goes on to say…



    "Although password protection improves the security of your personal information by making it harder for other people to read your notes without your permission, it is not a foolproof safeguard. Someone with physical access to your computer or device might still be able to figure out how to access your information. For this reason, we recommend that you avoid keeping extremely sensitive personal information in OneNote (for example, Social Security numbers or access codes to financial accounts).”

    https://support.office.com/en-us/ar...-for-Mac-c899633e-0e6b-4a8b-b5ae-a517006ad1bb

    Keep in mind the Mac version of OneNote 2016 also only offers OneDrive as a storage solution, and does not allow strictly local notebooks. In this instance “physical access to your computer” (as stated above) is irreverent and means someone with physical access to Microsoft’s servers.



    As far as I know the Windows version of OneNote still allows notebooks to be stored locally.



    



     
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