Encryption, Anonymity, and the “Right to Science”

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Apr 28, 2015.

  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Posts:
    5,103
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Posts:
    6,030
    That's an interesting article. Thanks for linking to it :)

    However, the "right to science" clearly has limitations. We're not free to build nuclear weapons, for example, or antiaircraft missiles, for example. And that's a very good thing! But we are free to be private, even if some of the necessary science also has evil applications. The article could have done more to clarify the distinction.
     
  3. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Posts:
    318
    "They claim the answer to this threat lies in maintaining governments’ ability to access intelligible digital communications data and content, including through cooperation from telecommunications companies."

    Yes and this is absolute rubbish. We need a full debate on these claims to expose the ludicrousness of their entire reasoning and premise for this. If they legislate to ensure digital communications and storage are not secure criminals simply won't use them or they will find ways to hide the storage media itself which is not difficult considering how small they are.
    What we really need is legislation to outlaw legislation that in any way affects the lives of, or restricts the innocent in the name of law enforcement, anti terrorism or any other propaganda based label they attach to it.
     
  4. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Posts:
    6,030
    Those in control always want to know everything. Those who need privacy are most motivated to get it. And at least some of them are willing to share their methods. So the rest of us can benefit. And the control freaks can go pound sand ;)
     
Loading...