Do you trust the cloud?

Discussion in 'polls' started by Page42, Feb 5, 2010.

?

Do you trust the cloud?

  1. Yes

    9.6%
  2. No

    32.9%
  3. Yes, but it depends on the vendor

    44.3%
  4. I don't know if I do or not

    6.6%
  5. I probably will someday

    3.0%
  6. I once did but I don't now

    1.8%
  7. Other (please explain)

    1.8%
  1. Ibrad

    Ibrad Registered Member

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    That would be depending on the vendor, Panda Labs only send hash codes to their server. We can use that same argument against non-cloud AV vendors, they may be uploading our files to their servers and their servers may be hacked.
     
  2. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    You've either got to be kidding or you're affiliated with one of those companies.
    Whether it's locally installed or cloud based, scanners are obsolete technology. Trying to enhance AVs with cloud technology is nothing more than an attempt to keep that obsolete technology relevant, and to keep users paying. Users have several better options for securing their systems.
     
  3. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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    Choice #4 "I don't know if I do or not"
     
  4. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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  5. hiten

    hiten Registered Member

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    I think the concept of cloud is just the same as bank.

    Bank allow you to store your money and withdraw it as you needed. But you must be careful in choosing your bank.
     
  6. carat

    carat Guest

    I don't know if I do or not :doubt:
     
  7. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    There is an old song from the 60's "I've looked at clouds from both sides now". :D Sorry just couldn't resist that!


    Cloud?

    There is no cloud only vendor hosts and packets coming in and packets going out.

    If the cloud guys are crooks you are in trouble.

    Every time I update my MS operating system I venture into the "cloud"

    So if MS is a spy well I'm cooked!
     
  8. Dark Lord

    Dark Lord Registered Member

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    Yes, but it depends on the vendor
    Yeah i trust Panda as "Ibrad" said above :thumb:
     
  9. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

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    Depends on vendor. I certainly won't trust rogue AV clouds, but do believe in reputable and accountable companies.
     
  10. littlebits

    littlebits Registered Member

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    No I do NOT trust cloud-based AV's.

    Reasons that I don't trust them:

    I have tried Panda Cloud, Immunet, Norton's Community Watch, Kingsoft, etc.

    All they have ever detected on my systems that were not already detected by my real-time AV were false positives. Some of which were important files that could have caused damage to my systems if they were removed.

    What's ever worst is they didn't detect many real malwares that my real-time AV's detected. (Avast, MSE, AVG, Avira, etc.)

    Therefore cloud-based AV's are useless to myself, maybe other users might benefit from using them.

    Thanks.:D
     
  11. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

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    False positive correction should be faster using cloud programs as well. The amount of false positives and proper signatures depends on the company, not whether they're cloud or not.
     
  12. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    Nope. Never trust anything unless it is mine or have total control over. :D
     
  13. Athletic

    Athletic Registered Member

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    I don't even trust other AV-s.
    Too much system consuming, slower PC and it's not powerful protection.

    Rather, better solution is light cloud AV like Prevx than bigger ones.
     
  14. pcdoctor36

    pcdoctor36 Registered Member

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    In my opinion placing trust in the cloud is akin to trusting Microsoft to fix a security vulnerability. The bottom line is the cloud is here. If you put your head in a vacuum and refuse to adapt it's your own short sightedness that's to blame. If security vendor x is acting responsibly you never have to worry about virus definitions again. I have a little bit of a control issue over knowing that whatever security platform I am using is updated by my own hand. Guess that's where knowing your cloud vendor comes in.

    Do I trust the cloud? Perhaps, with healthy skepticism. Time will tell.
     
  15. CloneRanger

    CloneRanger Registered Member

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    Not the ones with Chemtrails in them :thumbd:

    Generally NOT, depends on the vendor ! Having said that, i don't like the idea of Any of my data being stored out there, data breaches & all that are ALL too common :thumbd: And they are the ones we get to hear about !
     
  16. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    Darn.
    I didn't include that as a category, and should have.
    But you got as close to it as you could by voting,
    "Yes, but it depends on the vendor".
    ;)
     
  17. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    To me saying "Do you trust the cloud?" is like saying "Do you trust computers?" or "Do you trust Windows?"

    Really, it's all case-by-case. I trust my computer and my Windows setup. I don't trust someone elses setup necessarily.
     
  18. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    Good point.
    Because computing has become so synonymous with the cloud, right?
     
  19. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Isn't there a difference between a program that uses the cloud, like an AM/AV versus cloud computing, where more personal type data is floating around somewhere?

    I suppose one would be more apt to trust a program that uses the cloud as long as it isn't reading any personal data other than file names. And on the opposite side of the coin, it would be fairly hard to trust any cloud-whatever that has my personal data. Not because you could not trust a source, but that the source itself might become compromised, and all your data along with it.

    Or maybe I misunderstand all the fuss with cloud technology.

    Sul.
     
  20. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    There's two types of cloud technology. Cloud storage and cloud computing. Cloud computing shouldn't need ANY personal data - the idea is to streamline performance (overcoming the significant overhead of cloud-based actions) for applicaitons like games or photoshop so that low-cost computers can use them.

    Cloud storage is different, there's definitely some personal data that can be stored. Email is cloud storage - we all trust email, don't we? (though I know some don't... )
     
  21. Page42

    Page42 Registered Member

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    What do you mean by 'fuss'? Concern? :doubt:
     
  22. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Not really concern, more like all the "hub bub", the fascination. I mean, yeah, that is the direction it has been going over the years, but it isn't really anything new IMO.

    Think about it like this. As Hungry Man points out, web mail is kept in the cloud. AV updates are kept in the cloud. Storage sites for files and pictures have been in the cloud. The only thing new today is that programs are now in the cloud. You only need to have a light footprint because a lot of what used to be local is now in the clound. This is good I guess because the central service hosts the files that are updated a lot, and from a security perspective it lets them maintain control of needed files etc.

    So my saying, what all the fuss is about, is why the fascination as of late? Until the word "cloud" came about, a lot of what it does was already being done. The cloud is now a central focus, so you see it more, but it was there for a long time.

    Sul.
     
  23. ExtremeGamerBR

    ExtremeGamerBR Registered Member

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    Yes, but it depends on the vendor
     
  24. moontan

    moontan Registered Member

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    the only way i would trust the cloud is if my own data was encrypted by me before uploading.

    no way i would ever used a password manager that store my passwords in the cloud.
     
  25. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    I don't see the advantage of cloud storage or cloud computing, but I do see plenty of potential disadvantages.

    Regarding cloud storage, hard drives sizes are in the Terabyte range now. Storage media has never been cheaper. Portable storage is cheap, small, and is available in sizes and types that fit most any possible need from a few GB that fits on a keychain to a few terabytes that fit in a coat pocket. Why make data storage dependent on internet access and all of the security and privacy problems that come with it?

    Regarding cloud computing, even most low end computers can run most any software you need. The processing power and RAM of most modern computers is more than sufficient to run all but the most poorly coded apps. If I need a particular type of software, I'll install it on my own PC. Why be dependent on cloud computing for things your own PC will do just fine?

    Regarding cloud based or dependent security apps, the advantages of this are being greatly exaggerated. With or without the cloud, AVs are a reactive technology. Even if the cloud did mean instant updating of detections, that does not mean that detections for any given piece of malware will be available any sooner or that they'll be any more complete. Reputation is just as meaningless. Until something is seen and examined, it can't have a reputation. One of the first steps in securing your PC is reducing the attack surface. Making your security package dependent on the cloud makes those cloud servers part of your attack surface, a part that you have little if any control over. If they're compromised, you have a problem that's probably beyond your ability to fix or mitigate, assuming that you even know that a problem exists. The internet that connects you to those cloud servers isn't secure in any way. Your security package will be dependent on the same vector from which most attacks come.

    IMO, adding "the cloud" to AVs and security packages is nothing more than an attempt to enhance and market a failing technology. A properly designed security package can stand on its own, with no need for the cloud. Right now, there's several different kits that can make custom malware that AVs won't recognize. The number of variations these kits can make is nearly infinite. Those who market these cloud dependent security apps would like you to believe that this "new technology" will be able to detect them all. In reality, that's totally impossible. The more involved, disguised, or polymorphic malware gets, the more it makes sense to keep tract of and permit the hundred or so known clean executables on your system and just block the rest.

    Given todays political climate and the desire of the powers that be to monitor and stick their nose into everyones business, think about cloud computing and the idea of trusting your data and computing needs to servers/apps belonging to people you've never met. Small wonder the idea of using software on cloud servers is being pushed. It gives them access to data has always been out of their reach before. From a privacy perspective, nothing beats using apps installed on your own equipment. Most likely, your own equipment will run those just fine. If you look, you'll probably find an Open Source version that will fill your needs at no cost. Why use the cloud?
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
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