disk usage analyzer; help please

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by cet, Apr 2, 2010.

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  1. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    I could not find a way to figure out how much disk space is used.There is a utility called baobab and I instaled it using the terminal but there is no GUI to it.It comes by default on Ubuntu but I could not find a way to use it on Kubuntu.
     
  2. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Last edited: Apr 2, 2010
  3. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    I do not remember the GUI components, but this is a great opportunity to teach you a little command line utility called df:

    df - report file system disk space usage


    df -l

    Will display all local filesystems.

    df -lh

    Will display all local filesystems in "human" terms (MB, GB, etc).

    This is the manual page, if you're interested:
    http://linux.die.net/man/1/df

    Most GUIs are merely frontends for df.

    Regards,
    Mrk
     
  4. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    hello cet

    the most easy way to get an idea of how disk is used by linux is

    1st system monitor of gnome you can add it as well in kubuntu if you like
    file system it show disk usage

    2nd disk usage analyser you need to install in from kubuntu package manager

    3rd you can add hard-disk analyser from up right top conner you see the widgets you can add widgets from it

    sorry i am not kde fan or kubuntu so please give me some time i search a tool but if you like mean time

    you may install gnome system manager or disk usage analyser




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNcldU_zCw0
     

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  5. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    Both df -that Mrk mentions- and du can help you.
    Code:
    du / --max-depth 1
    This tells du (disk usage) to scan from root (/), to a maximum of 1 directory deep, or rather, print only disk usage for each folder in root, not subfolders.
    If you remove the / it will scan from the home folder, if you add -h it will "print sizes in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)".

    As usual, to find out more, try
    Code:
    du --help
    or
    Code:
    man du
    An alternative is to use a GUI program. I like KDirStat, which has a Windows clone named WinDirStat. Should be in Ubuntu's repository, but i don't know for sure. It's in Debian at least.
     
  6. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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  7. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    It actually scans whatever directory you're in, sorry. To find where you're at, type pwd (print working directory).
     
  8. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    Thank you for all.I found out that Ubuntu is easier to use than Kubuntu.Many programs come by default.Disk space analyzer comes by default too.I had to do a little work but that is not important I am learning Linux.I found out that disk space analyzer program is included in the gnome-utils package.I downloaded that package but still it is not shown in the accesories section as Ubuntu.I opened the terminal and typed baobab,the GUI opened.I love the KDE desktop but the gnome desktop is easier to use.I have Ubuntu on my vmware player.

    I tried it thanks.
    I have Pardus on vmware too and in Pardus you can have different wallpapers on different desktops(4 desktops,4 wallpapers)and the disk usage analyzer and Skanlite comes by default.I had to install Skanlite on Kubuntu.
     
  9. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    you can use

    df -h -T as well its show type of filesystem

    $ df -h -T
    Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/hda6 ext3 20G 9.3G 9.1G 51% /
    /dev/hda7 reiserfs 13G 2.1G 11G 17% /mnt/suse
    /dev/sda1 vfat 241M 152M 90M 63% /media/usbdisk

    also please try mint linux 8 as well its based on ubuntu and i guess it contain almost every thing for a home user in default mode its 2.5 gb compressed into cd

    you can get a manual as well

    http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WejA5zVu_B0
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMeLhvfDP_0

    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/linux-mint-helena.html
     
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