Disk Clone

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by dedrummond, Nov 23, 2005.

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  1. dedrummond

    dedrummond Registered Member

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    I "cloned" by Disk 1 (dive C system) to USB drive. Both drives are 250 GB. Question, if Disk 1 (drive C) failes (crashes)..format disk 1 (drive c), and clone the USB dirive, to drive c. I disconnected the USB drive, and no problems with the system.
     
  2. bobdat

    bobdat Registered Member

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    You can do it but using the Create Image/Restore feature is far more efficient.
     
  3. dedrummond

    dedrummond Registered Member

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    Bobdat:

    Where can I find Create Image/Restore feature?
     
  4. Ozmaniac

    Ozmaniac Registered Member

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    If you're using True Image 9, select Backup, the first option under Pick a Task on the first screen.
    That will take you into the Create Backup Wizard.
    If you check the top box beside the disk number, it will image the entire disk.
    The options and procedure are virtually the same for all versions of True Image. :cool:
     
  5. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello dedrummond,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    Please note that there are two approaches available:

    Clone Disk - moves the entire contents of one disk drive to another;

    Create Image - creates a special archive file for backup and disaster recovery purposes;

    Please read more in this FAQ article.

    Actually, Clone Disk approach is usually used to upgrade the hard drive (e.g. install a larger disk), while Create Image approach is basically dedicated for the complete data backup and disaster recovery purposes.

    Since you are interested in backing up your hard drive for the disaster recovery purposes, I would recommend you to follow Create Image approach.

    You can also find more information on how to use Acronis True Image 9.0 in the respective User's Guide.

    If you have any further questions please feel free to ask.

    Thank you.
    --
    Alexey Popov
     
  6. dedrummond

    dedrummond Registered Member

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    Still not clear on “Clone Disk,” and “Create Image.”

    What I need is a complete replacement of the original C (my system disk)…it case it is blown up…destroyed…falls apart.... Pull the original C, and replace it with a drive (containing everything on the original C), and start the system.

    Failed to find specific “Create Image.” However, “Create Backup Wizard” list “Operation 2 of 2, Creating partition image. Also, “Operation Progress”: Operation 2 of 2, Creating partition image.

    The operation created a “MyBackup.tib” file on my USB drive (Drive F), with file size considerably less than Drive C’s 13.4 GB used space.

    Correct resulto_O
     
  7. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello dedrummond,

    I'm sorry for not being accurate enough in my explanation.

    Create Image approach that I mentioned above is certainly the same as Backup wizard that you used to create your "MyBackup.tib" image archive.

    If your system fails you will just need to boot your PC from Acronis True Image 9.0 Bootable Rescue CD and restore the system from the beforehand created image archive.

    I would also like to remind you that you can find the detailed instructions on how to create and restore images in Acronis True Image 9.0 User's Guide.

    If you have any particular questions on how to use this software, please let me know what exact steps\actions described in the above mentioned User's Guide you can not understand\perform. I'll certainly try to help you.

    Thank you.
    --
    Alexey Popov
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2005
  8. dedrummond

    dedrummond Registered Member

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    Alexey:

    Please check my procedure (in case of system failure):

    1. Enable booting from CD-ROM drive in BIOS.

    2. Boot system, with CD-RW (created using “Tools: Create Bootable Rescue Media.”)

    3. Format, and install Microsoft Windows XP Pro, on new drive C.

    4. Restore Full Backup (G:\Cdrivebackup) from USB Drive G to Drive C.
     
  9. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    Step three is not required. Once your have booted with the rescue disk, you are in a Linux environment. You will see an interface that will allow you to choose Restore. You then choose the Cdrivebackup you created on drive G: and restore it. Since you have made this a complete drive backup (ticking this box), your new drive should be bootable.

    The only caveat is if you are restoring to a new drive that is larger than the original drive. Then you should follow the instructions given by Irina here. Better still follow the instructions given my Menorcaman here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2005
  10. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    It seems to me a lot of this required nonsense would be simplified if Acronis figured out how to restore the MBR without having to do the whole physical disk. I don't remember requiring any of this convolution when restoring a single bootable partition to a new larger disk using DriveImage - or is there a good reason for it?
     
  11. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    I'll let the experts answer that one. I've never had to restore an image to a new drive, much less to a new drive larger than the source drive.
     
  12. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    If you are restoring a whole drive image it can be to ANY size drive provided that it has it is has room for the size of the source data.
    For example whenever I test a new build of TI I frequently use a 40 GB replacement drive to take a 13 GB image from an 80 GB source. I have even fitted it on to an old 20 GB drive with no problems.

    Xpilot.
     
  13. dedrummond

    dedrummond Registered Member

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    Alexey:

    Great...no need for step 3 (Format, and install Microsoft XP Pro, on new drive C).

    Another problem solved…thank you for your help.
     
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