Could my 'blue screen' be a new-router problem?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by razorboy, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. razorboy

    razorboy Registered Member

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    I started getting blue screens on my newish and strong desktop computer, and it occurred when turning it on or off. It eventually occurred to me that this started about the same time that Rogers - IPS from Hell - took over our neighbourhood business and we all got new routers as Rogers replaced the old ISP. Could new drivers-new router be causing the problem, and if so, how do I rectify it?

    Thank you.
     
  2. hjlbx

    hjlbx Guest

    If you installed drivers - then that could be the cause.

    To get to the bottom of a BSOD you have to send the MEMORY.dmp (dump) to the source has the file symbols needed to decipher it. The source would typically be the driver publisher.

    Note, that on the BSOD you will see next to the BSOD type - the offending driver it that is the cause.

    There are utilities that can analyze and attempt to determine the cause of a BSOD - but they are inaccurate. The only accurate way to determine the cause of BSOD is manual analysis of the memory dump file.

    If that is not an available option, then it is all trial-and-error in fixing the situation.
     
  3. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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  4. razorboy

    razorboy Registered Member

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    To clarity: I didn't install any drivers. The only change is that when I first got the computer installed here, we had ISP "A" and their router. Now I have ISP "B" and their router.
     
  5. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    You don't install drivers for routers. Your OS is not communicating with the router, it is communicating with network adapter. The "installation disks" that come with some routers just help you set up your network configuration - they don't install drivers. I NEVER EVER use those disk because they most often also foist junk on our systems we don't need.

    I would swap Ethernet cables. They are cheap but critical devices that cannot endure rough handling. And I might also try a different Ethernet port on the router too.
     
  6. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    I expect it is an unrelated coincidence. I would use BlueScreenView as mentioned above and at least see what the code is. I have never seen a router cause a BSOD.
    If it is hardware it is most likely RAM or power supply.
    If it is software it is probably drivers for a device within your PC, but not outside of it.
    Post the info from BlueScreenView, or everyone is just guessing.
     
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