copying a backup

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by cmar, Nov 10, 2006.

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  1. cmar

    cmar Registered Member

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    On an external HD, I created a full backup of my HD with True Image 10. If I copy the backup file (.tib) to a different external HD, will that backup file still work for recovery?
    Thanks, CMA
     
  2. Ralphie

    Ralphie Registered Member

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    Sure it will. The program doesn't care where you put the file, as long as you point it in the right place to find it when needed.
     
  3. bVolk

    bVolk Registered Member

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    But do validate the copy as well.
     
  4. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    it is just a file, so you can copy it whereever you like. Not only that it is a good idea to duplicate copies of backups to a different medium anyway.

    Note the sound advice from bVolk about validation checks. I believe this is important not only after copying, but before restoration too.

    F.
     
  5. Ralphie

    Ralphie Registered Member

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    The only thing about validation is the number of false positives forum members report here. So be sure to give it the acid test and Restore/Recover an image to a hard drive and see if it boots.
     
  6. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Hi Ralphie

    absolutely right. My point was really trying to emphasise that just because a file validates on one medium and seems to copy without errors to another, it does not mean that it will validate from there too.

    I agree that there is nothing like a real restore to test the system out, but remember that still does not guarantee it will work the next time you try it. Hence the importance of verifying before any restoration.

    F.
     
  7. cmar

    cmar Registered Member

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    Thanks for the tip about a 2nd validation. (I assume that can be done by pointing at the copy from within True Image 10.)
    However, trying a Recovery does not seem feasible. To where would one recover without destroying a current working partition?
     
  8. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Carry a spare hard drive as part of you backup kit.

    If you have an unused drive bay fit an exchangable rack and with a couple of drawers you are really in backup Heaven. Shop around these gadgets are very inexpensive.

    No more need for any validations because a restore of an image is the ultimate proof.

    My method is to pull the current drive right after an image has been run automatically. Pop in yesterday's drive and run a restore.

    Xpilot
     
  9. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Hi Xpilot

    If you are saying that your restoration is now effectively your backup on a second hot disk then fine, I would agree, and that's a nice place to be. For those who prefer to rely on each every binary digit of of an image file staying intact then I think it would be folly not to validate before restoration.

    F.
     
  10. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    It would only be folly if one was to restore to one's only live master disk because a failed restoration would leave you with nothing. But fear not as one would have other images to recover from. Of course when restoring to a blown away drive or to one straight out of the box there is no risk in leaving out the validation stage, just a considerable time saving.

    By doing the restoration to "yesterday's" drive there is no risk at all because the current working drive is safe outside the computer.

    There are checks built into the restore program to ensure correctness of the restore. I have not been able to find out what they are in detail but they are there.
    Witness the fact that it is possible to have a failed restore from validated image.

    Validating an image merely says that the image has passed the test at that point in time. It does not wrap the image in protective clothing nor does it ensure that every binary digit will be in place in the restored drive. The restore program does that itself.

    My level of confidence is due to the fact that I do restores as part of the regular backup process so I know it works day in day out. i do not leave it till disaster strikes. I also check and top up the pressure in my spare wheel on a regular basis before I get a blow out [​IMG]

    Xpilot
     
  11. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Yes if you are restoring to a separate disk that is a totally different ballgame.

    Very true. However validating before restorating to a master drive is an imporatant check imv.

    Exactly why I suggest doing validation just before restoration ;)

    If it does, what does one get extra from selecting the "Validate backup archive before restoration" Additional setting. It seems to me there are possibly two levels of validation. If am restoring to my master drive I want it all.

    That's a nice place to be Xpilot. I find it is better use of my own time to adopt a less proactive approach and reduce the 'corruption' risk a little by occaisonally saving to multiple media. However if downtime was a huge issue I'm sure I would adopt an approach similar to yours.

    F.
     
  12. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    My view is there is nothing extra to be gained by selecting validation at that stage.

    As to time taken this really is quite trivial. Image creation from my standpoint takes none of my time. It runs automatically when I am not even at the computer. When I decide to swap drives and run a restore of the whole of my main drive it takes about 12 minutes from start to finish. NB. working with internal drives is usually many times faster than using external drives particularly for restores.

    When I first started down this particular route to protect my computer I went through the restore process every day to shake it down ASAP. Now I have had it running for several months I take a more relaxed position and may only actually swap drives once or twice a week. Though I still have the daily backups available should I need them.


    pilot
     
  13. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Any validation at all, or just the 'extra' option. Any idea what the difference between them might be ?


    Nice to hear it works well, particularly with little interaction. As I say, not quite the right solution for me. I have data organised into a number of partitions and I need the ability to restore any chosen one occaisionally. I have no requirement to be up and running quickly, but if my system partition did go down I could restore one from a 2 or 3 day old backup at any time in around 20 mins.

    Each to their own.

    F.
     
  14. cmar

    cmar Registered Member

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    Xpilot, you are clearly a very advanced computer user. For the average user, putting in an extra HD is just not a feasible solution to test a backup.

    I have a much more basic problem: how do you do a recovery if Windows is gone and you can't reboot the system in the first place. It's easy to do a TI 10 backup, but I don't see any method for recovery, since you can't create a bootable HD without TI Server, according to the error message I got when I tried to create one.
     
  15. Ralphie

    Ralphie Registered Member

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    cmar, you have something else happening to prevent making the bootable CD. ALL versions of True Image will have the feature to create the bootable Rescue CD, independently of another version.
     
  16. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    The normal method to run a recovery is to boot from the rescue CD which you have prepared earlier.
    Have you been through the Create Bootable Rescue Media Wizard and made a rescue CD?

    I do not understand your reference to Ti server this has no place in the TI 10 home program.

    I suggest you open help about in the Acronis program and see what you have actually got installed.

    Xpilot
     
  17. TheWeaz

    TheWeaz Registered Member

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    From another post (of yours I think) -


    “Rescue Media Builder is not installed. Start True Image Enterprise Server custom setup.”

    During installation you are asked to select something like “Typical”, “Complete” or “Custom”. I always choose “Custom”. There, you will see an option to install the Rescue Media Builder”. I assume that this was not installed when TI was first put on your system.
     
  18. starsfan09

    starsfan09 Registered Member

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    Sure it is. Every computer has a HD. Some just have ONE HD. If that's the case, then just remove that HD, ...Pop in a Spare HD, and then Restore.
    If it works, then switch the HD's back.

    As XPilot suggests, Restoring a Image to a Spare is a quick, and effective way to make sure the Image is going to work when you need it to.
     
  19. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    I reckon I could do it blindfolded on a very dark night. However what do we mean by average user here. My mother is pretty whiz for a 73 year old when it comes to using a PC. But if I asked here to change the disk she wouldn't even get as far as taking the base unit covers off. Wouldn't have a clue.

    F.
     
  20. starsfan09

    starsfan09 Registered Member

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    She always has you to call. ;)
     
  21. cmar

    cmar Registered Member

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    The Weaz has it completely correct. I did a custom install of my downloaded TI 10. I installed TI 10 and Bart PE but not Rescue Media Builder. So when I try to create a Rescue Disk, I get this error:

    “Rescue Media Builder is not installed. Start True Image Enterprise Server custom setup.”
     
  22. cmar

    cmar Registered Member

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    Thanks, XPilot, I appreciate your assitance. I opened Help: I have this installed: 10.0 (build 4,871)
     
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